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Tripel Honey Wit

256 calories 20.9 g 12 oz
Beer Stats
Method: All Grain
Style: Belgian Tripel
Boil Time: 60 min
Batch Size: 5 gallons (fermentor volume)
Pre Boil Size: 6 gallons
Pre Boil Gravity: 1.051 (recipe based estimate)
Efficiency: 75% (brew house)
Source: Foxtail Brews
Calories: 256 calories (Per 12oz)
Carbs: 20.9 g (Per 12oz)
Created Friday September 15th 2017
1.078
1.012
8.7%
22.8
5.8
5.7
n/a
 
Fermentables
Amount Fermentable Cost PPG °L Bill %
5 lb American - Red Wheat5 lb Red Wheat 38 2.5 38.5%
2 lb American - White Wheat2 lb White Wheat 40 2.8 15.4%
2 lb American - Smoked Malt2 lb Smoked Malt 37 5 15.4%
1 lb Flaked Barley1 lb Flaked Barley 32 2.2 7.7%
1 lb Flaked Wheat1 lb Flaked Wheat 34 2 7.7%
2 lb Honey2 lb Honey - (late boil kettle addition) 42 2 15.4%
13 lbs / 0.00
 
Hops
Amount Variety Cost Type AA Use Time IBU Bill %
1 oz Goldings1 oz Goldings Hops Pellet 4.5 Boil 40 min 14.84 50%
1 oz Saaz1 oz Saaz Hops Pellet 3.5 Boil 20 min 7.97 50%
2 oz / 0.00
 
Mash Guidelines
Amount Description Type Temp Time
13.75 qt Strike Temperature 154 °F 60 min
Mash Out Temperature 170 °F 10 min
12.25 qt Batch Sparge Sparge 170 °F --
Starting Mash Thickness: 1.25 qt/lb
 
Other Ingredients
Amount Name Cost Type Use Time
1 oz Sweet Orange Peel Flavor Boil 20 min.
 
Yeast
White Labs - Belgian Ale Yeast WLP550
Amount:
1 Each
Cost:
Attenuation (avg):
81.5%
Flocculation:
Medium
Optimum Temp:
68 - 78 °F
Starter:
No
Fermentation Temp:
70 °F
Pitch Rate:
0.35 (M cells / ml / ° P) 125 B cells required
0.00 Yeast Pitch Rate and Starter Calculator
 
Target Water Profile
Balanced Profile
Ca+2 Mg+2 Na+ Cl- SO4-2 HCO3-
0 0 0 0 0 0
I just used my tap water. No additions.
Mash Chemistry and Brewing Water Calculator
 
Notes

Brew Instructions below

FIRST BREW
Had bad efficiency - attempted a stove-top mash, regularly had the water temperature go over 180 degrees. Ended up with about a 28% efficiency (Starting OG of 1.044).

The taste of the beer itself was fantastic, though. The head was amazing, with a great retention.

Add Flaked Grain with the orange peel and coriander seed
Add 2lb Honey during final 10minutes

SECOND BREW
02/03/19
Started second brew. Lost about 1lb of crushed grain in transport from my local homebrew store, and used 3lb honey instead of 2lb. OG read at 1.067 after temperature correction. I also changed the type to a Bier de Garde to closer match the style to the beer. Though I believe it would technically be a belgian doppelbock, I'm not quite sure if that exists. For now I'll call it a Belgian Specialty. I also didn't realize you're not supposed to boil the flake, so I changed those late additions to be used with the mash.


60 min boil

COLLECT THE STRIKE WATER.

You will need 1.3 quarts of water for
every pound of grain to be mashed.


HEAT THE STRIKE WATER TO 175° F.

Pour the heated water into the mash tun. Slowly add the grist (crushed grain) to the water in the mash tun. If you are using flake, be sure to add some rice hulls for proper drainage, or to steep the flaked grains, as they will cause the mash to become mushy and clog filtration. Stir well to prevent clumping. The temperature should stabilize at 154° F. Hot or cold water can be added to correct the temperature, but a 5° variation is fine. DO NOT EXCEED 168° F DURING THIS STEP, or you may destroy the enzymes needed for starch conversion.


REST AT THIS TEMPERATURE FOR 60 MINUTES.
During this saccharification rest, malt enzymes convert the grain’s starch into to fermentable sugars.


WHILE THE MASH IS RESTING, COLLECT SPARGE WATER.

You will need 1/2 gallon of sparge water per pound of dry grist in the recipe. Heat the sparge water to 175° F.


MASH-OUT BY RAISING THE TEMPERATURE TO 168-170° F.

Add very hot (200° F) water to the mash, stirring constantly. Do not allow the mash temperature to exceed 170° F as hot temperatures can leach harsh tasting tannins from the grain.
REST AT THIS TEMPERATURE FOR 5-15 MINUTES.

  • NOTE - The main benefit of mashing-out is to raise the temperature of the mash in preparation for sparging, or the rinsing of sugars out of the mash. If the temperature of the mash gets too cold, the sugars will gum up making it exceedingly difficult for water to flow through the grain bed. Mashing-out also destroys the enzymes in the mash, preventing any additional starch conversion.

    Move water to the sparge water tank and continue with the procedure for sparging given below.


    RECIRCULATE!

    The initial runoff from the lauter tun is cloudy and filled with draff - small solid grain particles. The runoff should be clarified by recirculating the runoff through the grain in the lauter tun. To recirculate, open the valve on the lauter tun slightly and collect the runoff in an intermediate vessel(s) – two 1 quart measuring cups or pitchers work well. Fill one vessel and pour it gently down the side of the lauter tun. While you are pouring the wort back into the lauter tun fill the other vessel. Switch back and forth, filling and dumping, until the wort appears clear. At this point the wort can be drained into the boiling kettle. Make sure you keep the grain bed wet during the recirculation. Usually, after 5-15 minutes of recirculation, clarity
    improves dramatically.


    SPARGING.

    Open the valve on the sparge water tank to gently disperse
    the 170° F sparge water over the top of the grain bed. As in recirculating, do not allow the grain bed to go dry until sparging is complete. Avoid sparge water temperatures in excess of 175° F, as this promotes the extraction of tannins from the grain and leads to a harsh, astringent flavor in the finished beer. Stop sparging once you have collected an adequate amount of wort, or when the runoff reaches your target specific gravity.


    MOVE THE KETTLE TO A BURNER.

    When the sparge is finished and the wort collected, (it’s very heavy and hot - be careful!) move the kettle and proceed with the boil. Clean the mash/lauter tun and thoroughly rinse it with hot water; store components dry to keep them ready for the next brewing day!

    Allow Fermenation. With the yeast I use, which is safbrew WB-06, you only need to sprinkle the dry yeast on the top of the wort. Do your thing, though.

    Add in 8 oz honey for carbonation (Heat honey for easy pour)
    Bottle, enjoy in 2-3 weeks
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  • Last Updated: 2019-02-11 22:25 UTC
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