Vanilla cream ale for drinking this summer!

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Foster82, Jan 20, 2013.

  1. chessking

    chessking New Member

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    Why the protein rest? If using modified malts the protein rest is unnecessary. Its also a pain in the ass. Unless you are using a lot of unmodified malts, then do your self a favor and skip it. The purpose is to break up proteins in unmodified malts or unmalted grains. In fully modified malt the protein rest will actually reduce body and head retention. Also too long of a protein rest will result in the same "thin" beer.

    Read this section of "How To Brew"

    http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-4.html

    In fact if you haven't already, you should read the whole book cover to cover.

    If you still want to step mash in a BIAB setup be sure to keep the bag off the heat source (direct fire or electric element) as the bag will burn through. Ask me how I know. Or do a decoction to raise the temperatures. This can be dificult because if you don't get the decoction boiled and back in the mash , and the temperature raised in time, the protein rest will go long.
    A lot of extra work and very little return for a "simple summer lawnmower beer".
     
  2. Foster82

    Foster82 New Member

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    From what I have managed to research is that flaked grains can benefit from a protein rest. Even though the starches in flaked grains have been modified the proteins haven't really been broken up. The poor head retention problem is something I try to avoid by only doing a protein rest on the flaked grains and a pound of the base malt (added for the enzymes), thus not breaking up the proteins in the majority of the malt. I do agree it might be over the top for a "lawnmower beer" but I personally try improve on all of my brews, and hey why not experiment to see what works when you have the chance.

    I have found that the false bottom found in most steamer pots work well to prevent this. My new kettle actually has one that sets 2 inches off the bottom, which I might end up lowering.
     
  3. Conservidave

    Conservidave New Member

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    I think i will take baby steps and keep it simple for my first BIAB, once i have wert the rest will be business as usual (where i usually screw something up) :eek:
     
  4. Foster82

    Foster82 New Member

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    Conservidave, how did this brew turn out for you?
     
  5. Conservidave

    Conservidave New Member

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    Its been in the bottle for two weeks now so ill find out real soon. Decided to skip the BIAB and just go
    with my usual batch sparge which went very well. 1.061 OG and finished at 1.004. I'll report back in a few
    days with my initial impressions.

    Dave,
     
  6. Conservidave

    Conservidave New Member

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    First impression is that this beer is still a little green. it has a very thin body, a residual sweetness on the back of the tongue and high carbonation, no sign of the vanilla.

    One thing I noticed is that several of the bottles have a krausen ring between the cap and top of the beer, some bottles have the usual yeast cake on the bottom of the bottle and others don't.....? One of the bottles I opened broke off at the neck with the cap still intact.

    I am definitely giving it another week or two to condition after witch i'm sure it'll be consumed!

    Dave.
     
  7. 7 Slot Brewing

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    Opinions on the PM version I created of this recipe?
    HOME BREW RECIPE:
    Title: Vanilla Cream Ale

    Brew Method: Partial Mash
    Style Name: Cream Ale
    Boil Time: 60 min
    Batch Size: 5.25 gallons (ending kettle volume)
    Boil Size: 6 gallons
    Boil Gravity: 1.023
    Efficiency: 65% (ending kettle)

    STATS:
    Original Gravity: 1.050
    Final Gravity: 1.014
    ABV (standard): 4.71%
    IBU (tinseth): 17.01
    SRM (morey): 2.95

    FERMENTABLES:
    2.5 lb - American - Pale 2-Row (29.4%)
    1.75 lb - Flaked Corn (20.6%)
    0.75 lb - Flaked Rice (8.8%)
    0.5 lb - American - Carapils (Dextrine Malt) (5.9%)
    3 lb - Dry Malt Extract - Extra Light - (late addition) (35.3%)

    HOPS:
    0.75 oz - Williamette, Type: Pellet, AA: 4.9, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 17.01

    MASH GUIDELINES:
    1) Infusion, Temp: 154 F, Time: 60 min, Amount: 6.8 qt
    2) Sparge, Temp: 165 F, Time: 10 min, Amount: 6.8 qt, teabag

    OTHER INGREDIENTS:
    1 each - vanilla bean, Type: Flavor, Use: Secondary

    YEAST:
    Fermentis / Safale - American Ale Yeast US-05
    Starter: No
    Form: Dry
    Attenuation (avg): 72%
    Flocculation: Medium
    Optimum Temp: 59 - 75 F
    Fermentation Temp: 64 F
    Pitch Rate: 0.75 (M cells / ml / deg P)


    Generated by Brewer's Friend - http://www.brewersfriend.com/
    Date: 2013-09-06 22:43 UTC
    Recipe Last Updated: 2013-09-06 20:23 UTC
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    How about "Rock your Garter?" Sounds like good stuff!
     
  9. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    Recipe looks good to me.

    Ending kettle volume of 5.25 gallons - are you shooting for a keg? That doesn't leave a lot of room for trub losses, and losses in the fermentor. I do a batch size of 6 gallons (ending kettle) to fill a 5 gallon keg with finished beer.
     
  10. 7 Slot Brewing

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    No keg. wanted to end with 5 in fermentor, and 4.5 ish at bottling.

    First partial mash recipe/ experience, so any guidance there would be appreciated! :)
     
  11. LarryBrewer

    LarryBrewer Active Member

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    First partial mash, congrats!!

    Maybe set efficiency slightly lower. Calibrate thermometer beforehand. Double check equipment profile settings.

    Good luck!!
     
  12. 7 Slot Brewing

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    I will change efficiency to like 55 when I actually brew it, but I did want to design it as a 65% so I could see what it would be if I get beginners luck! :lol:

    I figured I would find a very simple easy beer to do as my first PM. Now it is a waiting game for my other 2 batches to finish.
     

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