Yeast strains for feedback.

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by IPLAYDRUMS, May 12, 2018.

  1. I_playdrums

    I_playdrums Well-Known Member

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    The yeast strain options are becoming prolific. Deciding which to use in a specific style has become my favorite part of recipe developing. Maybe a short review of different strains used will aid in the process.
    I went with Wyeast West Yorkshire 1469 with my stock ESB recipe and was pleasantly surprised by the woodsy esters rather the the floral esters from S-04. It is currently fermenting a Porter right now. 1469 dropped beautifully, and the ESB is nearly clear, with no fining.
     
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  2. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    I switched from almost exclusively using liquid yeast to using dry a few months ago because I have a problem getting fresh liquid yeast from my LHBS. Some they were trying to sell me was even past dating by several months. Ordering on line isn't an option most of the year due to the temperature extremes here. I now stock up on dry strains during the cooler months. With dry yeast the problem is quite the opposite. My main problem is finding an English ale yeast that I like.

    I don't like the flavor profile of either S-04 or Windsor. I have had problems with London ESB dropping out before finished as well as clarity issues. I use Nottingham in place of US-05 because it finishes just as clean in the low 60s and drops clear much faster, Thinking of trying it in the low 70s to see what kind of esters it produces. It just may be my choice for English ales too. So, since the switch to dry yeasts I'm searching rather than trying to select from a big variety. Guess it works both ways.
     
  3. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    If dry yeast does it for you then can't go wrong with that. I use liquid primarily but I run starters and have started banking it, so I end up maybe buying a pack a year for a refresh.

    I have a lot of BRY-97 and Nottingham dry yeasts kicking around for "Oh shit" situations as I like how it turns out.
     
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  4. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    I used liquid for several years and overbuilt starters to reduce the cost. Worked fine and I usually got 3 or 4 brews out of a vial or smack pack. If I had a source for reasonably fresh liquid I'd still be using it, but I'll be damned if I'll pay 8 bucks for crap that has 40% of its supposed cell count and questionable viability. Although I tried many strains during that period I ended up only using 2 or 3 regularly. If I find something dry that does a good job in English Ales I'm good.
     
  5. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    I'm with you on being a bit down on Windsor. It doesn't clear well and leaves a high final gravity. Flavor isn't too bad but not my favorite.

    Have you tried any of the Mangrove Jack dry yeast? They might have something you'd like better.
     
  6. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    No, but think I will. Thanks>
     
  7. I_playdrums

    I_playdrums Well-Known Member

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    S-05. The first yeast I used, still use, harvest, and plan beer recipes around. Slight lag in the starter, but once pitched goes nicely. Drops fairly clear, gelatin helps here. Flavor profile is clean, attenuation is high, so the FG can be low if you don't monitor gravity during fermentation. Confident in pitching this yeast into any style that does not require a yeast flavor profile.
     
  8. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    I have yet to find a dry yeast I like even close to the liquid strains available.
    I'm in the camp of liquid and re-using for 5+ generations. That being said, If I can help you out with fresh yeast and short, cold shipping times, let me know.
    Cheers,
    Brian
     
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  9. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, I'll keep that in mind.
     
  10. I_playdrums

    I_playdrums Well-Known Member

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    Brew Mentor.....if you harvest the yeast from the starter, is it still considered a generation later?
     
  11. N0mad

    N0mad Well-Known Member

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    This very thing happen to me last week being inexperienced as I am the LHBS sold me a pack of WYeast 1010 that was 5 months old and 24 hours after I pitched... Nothing!! not a bubble not anything...

    After researching the issue and discovered the cause I drove back over with the receipt and empty packet to get a replacement but all their WYeast 1010 was 5 months old so got some WLP 320 it worked but this is not what I wanted for the style I had brewed...

    I'm not equipped to make starters just yet and the wort was sitting in the fermenter @ 65° the clock was ticking...
     
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  12. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Yea, they want to have coverage so as not to miss a sale, but often it's at your and my expense. Having been in business myself, I understand that, but it needs to be balanced with a focus on the customer. Selling dated yeast at cost would be a compromise and give the customer the option without being a net loss to the LHBS.
     
  13. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    I would consider that still 1st generation because it was grown optimally with nutrient and oxygen. Also sanitation is nearly perfect, with minimal exposure.
    That being said, I'm not set up as a lab, so it's not perfect.
    Brian
     
  14. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    I'm able to get yeast every week, so I stock what I sell and order less commonly used stains when customers want them.
    The local Brewers appreciate getting yeast as fresh as I can get it and now just order ahead of time.
    I've found that more seasoned Brewers are planning their batch, brew day, recipe, etc. and are also building starters, so they don't mind shooting me an email or order ahead of time.
    Freshness is KEY!
    Cheers
     
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  15. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately, in my experience, you are an exception to the rule. For that I applaud you.
     
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  16. I_playdrums

    I_playdrums Well-Known Member

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    I work part time at the LHBS. Stocking liquid yeast seems like a bad idea. The seasoned brewer has a plan, like mentor said, knows his time frames, and will order yeast a week out, rather than taking from the cooler. Dry yeast is easier to stock. I would say 6 different dry yeast strains will cover 95% of homebrewers needs.
     
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  17. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I rarely get liquid yeast. But my LHBS usually has it in stock when I do want it, and I brew on a whim. They are no more likely to be sold out of a yeast when I want it than a hop when I want it. I think the LHBS should manage yeast stock like a grocery store manages any refrigerated stock.
     
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  18. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Agreed, 100%. Like IPLAYDRUMS stated, a few dry strains covers a large percentage of our needs as home brewers. Now that I have a new fridge that can do lager temps easily, 34/70 will be my house yeast, followed by Notty. Think I'll revisit S-04 brewed around 60F which is lower than I've done before. If it works for me, everything I normally brew is covered.
     
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  19. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    The problem is when the store tries to stock 60 or 80 different yeasts. Most shops Are Not going to go through that many. If they just stock a few popular ones they can keep those fresh and order anything else. Its kind of the curse of having so many choices now.
     
  20. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    If I ran a store, I’d stock what I thought I could sell. 60 or 80 yeasts seems a bit extreme.
     

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