Update: Fermentation time, Wyeast 1318, thick krausen, dry hopping advice

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by kaspar&piet, Nov 15, 2017.

  1. kaspar&piet

    kaspar&piet New Member

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    Hello,

    I need some advice for my dry hopping.

    I am currently fermenting an NEIPA using Wyeast 1318 London Ale III and after 8 days I am still waiting for it to finish. I read that this yeast is a top cropper, meaning that the krausen will not fall to the bottom, but will stay on top. Is that true? If yes, how do I dry hop? Since I have a pretty thick layer, I am guessing the hops will just lay on top of it.

    I already dry-hopped at high krausen and want to add a secon charge.

    Cheers!
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    I see your thinking that the hop particles will just sit atop of the beer having no wort contact. Maybe give the fermentor a gentle swirl to try and dislodge some of that stubborn krausen or you could scoop it clear with a sanitized spoon and then throw in dry hop charge. Or bag weigh down with marble and try that method which I think for dry hop aroma is the least preferred in my opinion. See what others think good luck hope she turns out plenty juicy.
     
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Krausen is just foam. The hops will fall through. And the whole krausen has to fall eventually. If it's a good NEIPA, you'll be throwing in a ton of hops. There'll be plenty of mass to bust through the crust. ;)
     
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  4. kaspar&piet

    kaspar&piet New Member

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    It's been 14 days, and there is still airlock activity (did not have a chance to take a gravity reading). I read posts where people say that the yeast finishes in 3-5 days. Does anyone have any ideas? I have never had a beer that needed this long.
     
  5. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Best way to know is when your hydrometer reading doesn’t change over 3 days. Then you know it’s done. What you’re seeing could be trapped CO2 being released
     
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  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    It's done when it's done. Use your hydrometer to determine it's done (same reading over 2-3 days, a refractometer works well as long as you're just looking for change), don't trust the airlock. I can't tell you why it's taking 14 days and you're still getting bubbles - my hypothesis would be that the beer is warming driving CO2 out of solution rather than fermentation but don't trust me, either. Trust your hydrometer. It won't lie to you.
     
  7. kaspar&piet

    kaspar&piet New Member

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    Yeah, I'll have to check gravity. The ideas as to why there is still airlock action is helpful nonetheless, so thanks for all the information!
     
  8. maha08

    maha08 New Member

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    Thank for all great information i got from here.
     

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