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Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by RalphK, Oct 28, 2020.

  1. RalphK

    RalphK Member

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    Brew day went well. I ended up with an original gravity of 1.063. However, I couldn't get the temperature of the wort below 24º Celsius (75,2º Fahrenheit) as I ran out of ice. I decided to get it into the fermenter rather than running 19º Celsius water through the chiller for another hour. I then pitched the yeast. I had collected a litre of yeast from my previous batch and then, for good measure I through in a packet of yeast as well. I used Belgian Abbaye Ale yeast. On the packet it said to rehydrate before pitching. I decided because I used some yeast from the previous batch that it probably wasn't necessary. Anyway, I slowly brought the temperature down to 21º (69,8º F) and kept it between 17 and 21 for 17 days. Expected final gravity was 1.006. However, When i bottled the beer today the Final Gravity was 1.016. I tasted a sample and it seems fine. And here is my question - Did something go wrong? What are the possible reasons that FG was not 1.006 and is that a problem? Any hints, clues and advices are greatly appreciated! Many thanks and Brew On!
     
  2. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    Was that FG reading confirmed over the course of a few (maybe 3) readings? I ask because my fear is that the yeast wasn’t done and you may have set yourself up for overcarbed finished beer, or worse yet, potential bottle bombs.

    If it truly was done, I wouldn’t point fingers solely at the pitch temp or not rehydrating the yeast. There are a lot of specific reasons why it could have stalled where it did, or it could have been a lot of little things.

    Another question, did you take the FG reading with a hydrometer or refractometer? If a refractometer, did you correct for the alcohol content? Sorry for the questions, just trying to rule stuff out.
     
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  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    You don't mention your batch size but you pitched enough yeast for 10 gallons easily, if the collect slurry was viable. You also don't mention that the yeast slurry collected was specifically the same as the packet but we'll assume it was all Abbaye yeast. Pitch temp wouldn't have caused any problem. Lack of rehydration would only be a problem if it was the only yeast you used. Fermentation temp should be fine, though fermentation with Belgian yeast is typically ended much higher to encourage esters and a dry finish.
    If you took multiple readings, it was stuck at 1.016 and won't likely go further, even in the bottle.
    If the yeast decided to stall, which some Belgian yeasts can do, it would have restarted over the 3rd week of fermentation and finished out much lower.
    If the situation is the latter, you'll have bottle bombs for sure. If it is the former, you'll just have beer that's under-attenuated for style and it'll be fine. There's nothing you can do but wait and see if they start popping. I'd keep those bottles covered while they carbonate.
     
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  4. RalphK

    RalphK Member

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    Thanks. Batch size was 20 litres. The slurry was also Belgian Abbaye. I took 2 readings with a hydrometer. However, the 2 readings were only 10 minutes apart. It was in the fermenter for 18 days.
     
  5. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    That's essentially one reading. Keep an eye on those bottles.
     
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  6. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    1.006 is really low finishing for beer yeast. 1.016 is a touch high but within reason. Might have just mashed warmer than you though.
     
  7. Donoroto

    Donoroto Member

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    Hawkbox beat me to it: 1.006 seems to my (Newbie) eyes as really low for a 1.063 wort to end up. 1.016 seems more 'normal'. But my experience is limited, OK?
    Without someone adding things to the batch (like sugar) I can't think of anything that'll increase the gravity like that.
     
  8. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    Lallemand's Belgian Abbaye Ale yeast is a high attenuator. >85% is not out of the question.

    That said, if the OP's beer truly finished at 1.016 then the attenuation was ≈75%
    The target final gravity of 1.006 would be ≈90%.

    Maybe that target FG was based on a different predicted OG, but we don't know what the expected OG was...just what the OP ended up with.
     
  9. philjohnwilliams

    philjohnwilliams Well-Known Member

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    It would be helpful if you could post your recipe and as much info about your brew session as you can remember.
     
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  10. RalphK

    RalphK Member

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    Expected OG was 1.061 expected FG was 1.006. However, according to the batch performance stats attenuation is at 74.6% given the Actual OG 1.063 and actual FG 1.016. You are correct - if I had got to 1.006 then attenuation would be at about 90%. See https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/edit/1055148
    I hope that helps. Thanks for all the advice.
     
  11. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Yeah...it's pretty likely that you bottled too early. Belgian styles are highly carbonated but if there's still 10 points of gravity, you'll blow bottles. I've had Belgians go to <75% attenuation sit for another week and then take off again. Abbaye yeast isn't the worst about this but I think it's definitely possible and it's very unusual for it to attenuate poorly - I used some Abbaye in conjunction with another yeast and went from 1.071 to 1.009. It's pretty important to raise the temp at the end of fermentation to keep them going and develop flavors.
    If the bottles start popping, or if you check and find that it's highly carbonated, put all the bottles into a very cold fridge to keep them from going further and you'll have beer to enjoy.
     
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  12. RalphK

    RalphK Member

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    Thanks. Will keep an eye on them.
     
  13. RalphK

    RalphK Member

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    Just an update. No bottle bombs as yet. It has been 2 weeks in bottles and am starting to drink them already. I suspect that there may have been an infection as the head on the beer is almost non existent. The fermenter I have is very difficult to clean as it has a narrow opening at the top. it looks like [​IMG]
    I got it when I first started brewing and did not know any better. I see the brewing supply store does not stock them any longer. Anyway - going to figure out how to clean it and get brewing :)
     
  14. Zambezi Special

    Zambezi Special Well-Known Member

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    I think the main thing for cleaning those is very hot water and soap. And let it soak, as you probably have a krausen ring inside.
    On the other hand, looks like a good option for no chill (if the jerrycan is HDPE)
     
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  15. RalphK

    RalphK Member

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    Pretty sure it is hdpe...may well try a no chill :)
     
  16. RalphK

    RalphK Member

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    I have verified it is hdpe...going to brew this weekend and will try a sort of half chill...just to get the brew down to about 75-80 c before transferring it. Mash Hacks on youtube has a video where he does a no chill brew :)
     
  17. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I've done a few no chill brews in my SS brewbuckets, they work fairly well.
     
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  18. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Hot PBW soak is the thing for any fermenter. At least 120 degrees and 1 tbsp per gallon right to the top. Soak for at least 20 minutes and make sure there's no krausen residue stuck to the side.
     
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