Overwhelmed with style/recipe options. Help!!

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by SabreSteve, Jul 25, 2020.

  1. SabreSteve

    SabreSteve Well-Known Member

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    Question:
    Is Lallemand nottingham ale yeast the same or similar to the Danstar? That's what came up on my local shops site when I searched for the Danstar
     
  2. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    Yes it is. - A great yeast that will drop nice and clear. :) Work horse at a wide temp range!
     
  3. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    The two names are actually the same company I believe. Lallemand is the company name and Danstar must be a category of some sort... You will see the green Danstar logo on the middle of the yeast pack.

    Anyway, I live by this yeast like others do US-05! Dry yeast, to me, is just so much easier and convenient. Lasts longer too. I use Notty and 34/70 for most beers. I have tried a few others too but enjoy these the most. If you want your Brown Ale to be less attenuated and a bit sweeter than the Lallemand Windsor Ale yeast might be the way to go. I didn't recommend just as I have only used it twice in the very distant past... I do have a couple packs in the fridge I plan on trying soon on either a brown or a scottish ale.
     
  4. SabreSteve

    SabreSteve Well-Known Member

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    Haven't used dry yeast yet. Used WLP300 on this first brew and that seemed pretty easy to use. I honestly would have thought dry yeast would be more difficult to use.

    I actually could probably start another thread but after reading some other threads I have a bunch of questions on harvesting yeast. Mainly best practices, storage, cleaning. I probably won't with the WLP300 just cause it'll likely be several brews before I come back around to it but the idea of getting 2-3 brews out of the same yeast is pretty appealing to me. At the very least if someone could recommend a good article or tutorial I'd appreciate it greatly.
     
  5. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn’t do it and I wouldn’t recommend it...but you certainly could. It would make for a long day however.
    I prefer my brewing process and my beer 2.5 gallons at a time.
     
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  6. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    MMMM - I love that yeast! Maybe you should make a weizenbock on the day you plan to bottle the hefe... Then you could dump your chilled wort right onto that yeast-cake for a nice healthy fermentation of a stronger beer. That's what I used to do with that yeast.

    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/13679/three-shutt-s-to-the-wind-weizenbock

    I tried harvesting yeast. It became a pain... I ended up just sticking to a couple dry yeast strains and learning them fairly well. I find that Notty and 34/70 make most the beers I like to brew. Pitching directly onto the yeast-cake of a previous batch is still something I do from time-to-time as it is handy and keeps me from running my pockets dry.

    (Admittedly, I do harvest occasionally)
     
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  7. SabreSteve

    SabreSteve Well-Known Member

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    So do you just leave all the trub in the fermenter and pour the wort in? If topped off to the same level and figuring they'll be a similar amount of sediment from the second batch won't that decrease the yeild from the second batch or is it not significant enough to worry about.
     
  8. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    There will most like be a larger amount of sediment as the good yeast will multiply again and drop out. Also, you'll have the extra trub from the new batch. I've done this many times though and have had great success. Juts add an extra quart or so of new wort. You should still achieve something close to 5 gallons.
     
  9. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    My thoughts are that you should maybe work on your brewing process, and leave harvesting yeast as a future endeavor. Or not, up to you. I am just thinking that your learning curve with brewing is pretty steep right now, and harvesting yeast is something that you can work towards.
     
  10. SabreSteve

    SabreSteve Well-Known Member

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    Oh definitely. Like I said I probably wouldn't with the WLP300 because like you're saying I don't want to try taking on too many new things at once. Just trying to ask questions and soak up as much knowledge and resources as possible now while I'm thinking of it so if I choose to do that a few brews down the road I'm ready or I atleast know where to look back to find the info.
     
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  11. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    The nice thing with dry yeast is you can hold a bunch of them in your fridge for your brews without much worry. They last a long time.
     
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  12. SabreSteve

    SabreSteve Well-Known Member

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  13. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Go with the Amber or light in my opinion. Neither will be bang on but they'll get you close. Amber will be darker.
     
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  14. SabreSteve

    SabreSteve Well-Known Member

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    Also no Phoenix hops. From my limited research challenger might be ok?
     
  15. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Challenger will go nicely with a brown ale.

    It won't be the same exactly but it will taste good.
     
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  16. SabreSteve

    SabreSteve Well-Known Member

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    Also love the "bang on" makes me think of Matt Ellis when he goes on the Buffalo sports radio station. Says it all the time.
     
  17. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Biggest thing to me to keep in mind with this, nothing we do will ever perfectly match what someone else gives us for a recipe.
    Water differences, grain suppliers, hop suppliers, etc... will cause variance no matter what.

    So as you get more comfortable you'll start to eyeball the substitutions more on your own and decide what you're willing to change to accommodate what you don't have handy.
     
  18. SabreSteve

    SabreSteve Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I was going to try just matching the color on the DME but didn't see an exact match. I appreciate the guidance
     
  19. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Generally if you have a choice between two recipes for the same beer, go with the simpler of the two. Doesn't always work but it's a good rule of thumb.
     
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  20. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    @Hawkbox just gave some solid advice! Amber and Challenger will do nicely I am sure. When you have limited supplies - you make what you can. :) It'll still be a killer beer!
     
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