Non-citrusy pale ale recipe

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Mutno, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. Mutno

    Mutno New Member

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    Can somebody share recipe with good hops combination to get non-citrusy beer. I know I have to stay away from Citra, Cascade, Centennial, Amarillo, Simcoe and maybe Chinook.

    So far I came up with one recipe, and do not know if it is any good:

    Type: All Grain
    Batch Size: 10.00 L
    Ibu 43.6
    Est OG 1.054

    2.20 kg Pilsner (Weyermann) (1.7 SRM)
    0.15 kg Caramunich II (Weyermann) (63.0 SRM)
    0.10 kg Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM)
    0.05 kg Acidulated (Weyermann) (1.8 SRM)

    This malt proportions and selections are same as my previous beer and they can be changed

    10.00 g Nugget [11.00 %] - Boil 60.0 min -
    15.00 g Hallertauer Hersbrucker [4.00 %] - Boil 20.0 min
    10.00 g Hallertauer Hersbrucker [4.00 %] - Boil 10.0 min
    15.00 g Hallertauer Hersbrucker [4.00 %] - Boil 0.0 min

    Safale American (DCL/Fermentis #US-05) or #US-04
     
  2. Finn B

    Finn B Member

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    #2 Finn B, Jul 21, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019
    The classic English combination would be 50/50 East kent Golding and Fuggles. That's always very nice. Not so classic, but nice and still English, is Bramling Cross, which doesn't resemble anything else.

    If you want to use continental hops, I'd go for Saaz. Actually English breweries historically have been using a lot of that, according to Ron Pattinson. Or you might try an American "noble" hop, Vanguard, which I like a lot in German beers.

    For a pale ale, though, I think the proper thing is English hops:).(But of course the proper thing is what you like best.) )
     
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  3. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    I second giggles or goldings. Great pale ale hops that are not citrus. Willamette can be good too for a US hop.
     
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  4. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    +1 to EK Goldings and Fuggles. I might pair them with Maris Otter if I was going "all in".
     
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  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Willamette is a good one. You could look at some of the German "character" hops like Huell Melon, too. I don't get much citrus from Simcoe, mostly pine and mango.
    I suspect that most American hops will lend a little citrus quality, but I suspect that your intention is to avoid the big grapefruit grapefruit notes. I think that there are plenty of American hops that go more toward floral notes with the citrus being lighter, sweeter and more orange-y in character.
     
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  6. Mutno

    Mutno New Member

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    Thank you all.

    I will go with English combination, EKG and Fuggles.

    So, should I use SAFALE S-04 because it is yeast for English style ales?
     
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  7. Finn B

    Finn B Member

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    Absolutely, though there are other alternatives when using dry yeast. Lallemande has got a few: Nottingham, London and Windsor. London is Fuller's yeast, I think - same as WLP002/Wyeast 1068 - and though I've never tried it, that's the one I'd pick.
     
  8. Mutno

    Mutno New Member

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    Unfortunately I can't find these alternatives, only dry yeast SAFALE.
     
  9. Finn B

    Finn B Member

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    I wouldn't brew an English Pale Ale without it;).

    But @Mutno : Don't let that disturb you. But looking at your grain bill, I'd definitely not use pilsner malt. You could use ordinary pale malt, or maybe American two row (which we don't get in Norway, so I've not had occasion to try it), and just add 2-3 percent of Munich light. That's a good way to mimick MO.
     
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  10. Finn B

    Finn B Member

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    #10 Finn B, Jul 22, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2019
    OK, I've never used 04, but it's OK, I guess. Just keep it on the cold side, as it is reported to give you a lot of juciy fruit esters if fermented on the warm side.

    And throw the pilsner out;). Or if you're set on using it, at least add those small percentages of Munich light. This beer should have some nice bready, biscuity notes.

    Adjusting water isn't always necessary. But I've found it helps to see to it that light English beers have a sulfate/chloride ratio in favor of sulfate. I use 3: 1.
     
  11. Mutno

    Mutno New Member

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    Ok, I have change the recipe. Added pale malt and Munich light, removed Caramunich II (Weyermann) :

    2.20 kg Pale Malt (Weyermann) (3.3 SRM) 90.5%
    0.07 kg Munich I (Weyermann) (7.1 SRM) 2.9 %
    0.10 kg Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) 4.1%
    0.05 kg Acidulated (Weyermann) (1.8 SRM) 2.1%

    For the water:

    ph=7.5

    Cl 25.9 ppm
    Na 11.2 ppm
    Mg2 12.7 ppm
    Ca2 73.1 ppm
    SO4 39.4 ppm
    НСО3 219.6 ppm

    I can't find gypsum or campden tablet
     
  12. Finn B

    Finn B Member

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    You just changed the recipe into an English Golden Ale by removing the crystal malt. It will be a really good beer - one of my favorites:) - but was that intended? In an EGA you could go 50/50 pale and pilsner, too - if you want it pointing more towards a pilsner, which the style was invented to compete with.

    If I'm messing things up for you: The important thing is the beer that exists in your head:). You might say some more about that.

    That's your brewing water, from the tap? Seems OK to me, though I would have liked to add some gypsum. It's not a big thing, so not to worry if you can't easily get some. Don't mess with campden tablets, it's got no function unless you're into LODO brewing, or your water is chlorinated.

    It's quite a lot of alkalinity there. I think you'll maybe need some more acid. Do you use any form of programme that can calculate that for you? (I don't, I've got a pH meter and a lot of experience with my own water, which doesn't help you much.)
     
  13. Mutno

    Mutno New Member

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    No, it wasn't my intention but I think I will experiment ;) I think I will add some pilsner, probably 50/50 pale and pilsner. and maybe small amount of crystal to get some darker color.

    I use BeerSmith, that is why I added Acidulated malt 2%. Program is telling me to add more but I think it will be to much.
     
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  14. Finn B

    Finn B Member

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    A small amount of crystal will be OK.

    According to Weyermann you can use as much as 10 percent. I'd say at least 5% is safe, meaning you won't notice it. (I use acidulated in all my light beers.) I would definitely do as beersmith says. What you add here will affect the pH of your final product, and you won't get that nice, crisp character you want if you get a too high pH in a light beer.
     
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  15. Mutno

    Mutno New Member

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