Medusa IPA - water chemisrty advice

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Grossy, Jun 6, 2017.

  1. Grossy

    Grossy New Member

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    Looking for some advice on water chemistry.
    Any advice on the recipe and the water salts would be greatly appreciated.

    I would like to brew an IPA this weekend. 22 gallon brew.
    Recipe: https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/497154/medusa-ipa
    I want a very citrus and floral IPA.

    I can use my tap water or RO water.

    Tap Water: PH 8
    Ca+2 40ppm, Mg+2 4ppm, Na+ 40ppm, Cl- 25ppm, SO4-2 13ppm (Wards), HCO3-134ppm

    RO Water: PH 7.3
    Ca+2 1ppm, Mg+2 1ppm, Na+ 5ppm, Cl- 2ppm, SO4-2 1ppm (Wards), HCO3-8ppm

    My reading of AJ deLange water primer states that I should add:
    8 tsp gypsum as well as 8 tsp calcium chloride
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    your tap water is fine although you have pretty high salt which will give you flavor but too much is noticeable and undesirable, I would add a couple campden tablets if you use it just to clean out the chemical taste but I have to say no on the 8 teaspoons with tap water looks like just 2.5 tsp of Calcium chloride in the mash will get you what you want

    this is a good hoppy beer profile

    Ca=110, Mg=18, Na=16, Cl=50, SO4=275
     
  3. Starter Hops

    Starter Hops Member

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    How you like those medusa hops?
     
  4. Grossy

    Grossy New Member

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    We'll find out, 1st time using them.
     
  5. Grossy

    Grossy New Member

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    I should have been more clear on 1st post.

    Adding the 8tsp of calcium chloride and gypsum would have been only in the RO water.
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I suspected that after posting but it would take at least 24 hours to produce that much RO water, have you used it before?
     
  7. Grossy

    Grossy New Member

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    I have two ways to get the RO.
    1. My system in the garage.
    2. There is a water station nearby.
     
  8. Grossy

    Grossy New Member

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    I have not had good results with my tap water and Pale Ales in the past.
    Stouts come out awesome.
     
  9. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    this is what I do I have a dual carbon filter system that I run my tap water through and it cuts everything in half but I like a balanced profile so I add an even amount of calcium chloride and gypsum back in just to bring up the calcium, you could do the same and use 50% RO but if you go with all RO I would add more that just calcium chloride and gypsum you need some other minerals for the yeast
     
  10. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    That was what I noticed in your water report: The alkalinity was not listed. If your water is very alkaline, you'd get those results. What matters, as long as you're not out for a specific mineral taste in your beer, is a factor called residual alkalinity and the acidity of your mash. Dark malts are acidic, so brewing with a high-alkaline water would work well while pale malts are less so, raising your mash pH above tolerance (5.2 - 5.6 with smaller numbers being better for lighter beers, larger numbers for darker beers). pH needs to be in that range for the beer to mash well.
     

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