Hops in the boil

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Denboy, Feb 21, 2019.

  1. Denboy

    Denboy New Member

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    ok I’m new at this and I’m reading and trying to understand something if the oils in your hop will boil out of your wort why do we put so much in the beginning and not more in the the end
     
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  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Volatile oils responsible for flavor and aroma are the ones that boil off. That's why we add hops late in the boil and at flame out...so we can get the aromatic qualities in the wort. The bitterness associated with hops comes from alpha acids that take longer to assimilate into the wort. Think of it as an inverse ratio of bitterness and flavor/aroma - more bitterness = less flavor and more flavor = less bitterness. Since we want both in most beers we balance the hop additions at the beginning and near the end of the boil to get the best of both worlds. Using different varieties of hops allows us to get what we need. Some hops are extremely good for flavor and aroma but impart a harsh bitterness. Some hops are perfect for bittering but lack in the sort of flavors and aroma that are desireable for some styles.
     
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  3. Denboy

    Denboy New Member

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    Thanks that makes sense appreciate your help understanding this. Now to figure which hop and when but for now I’ll stick with clones
     
  4. ChicoBrewer

    ChicoBrewer Well-Known Member

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    Look up bittering hops. Some suggestions are magnum and warrior. Commonly available and what I keep on hand. Too many flavor hops to mention.
     
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  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Hops are pretty style-specific. When it comes to American hops and styles that are very hop-forward like IPAs and Pales, it'll come down to which ones you enjoy brewing with and drinking. Plenty to choose from. :)
     
  6. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    All hops can impart bitterness, flavor, and, or aroma. The theory is that hops added at the beginning of the boil impart almost exclusively bitterness. Hops added in the middle of the boil impart mostly flavor, but some bitterness, and some aroma. Hops added at or near the end of the boil impart mostly aroma, some flavor, but almost no bitterness. Whirlpool hops and dry hops add almost exclusively aroma, some flavor, but almost no bitterness.

    Having said that, a local craft brewer recently told me that they almost never add any hops during the boil, their additions are almost exclusively whirlpool and or dry hops.

    They happen to make the best beer in town.
     
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  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    That's a great method for IPAs and Pales, etc...If you're making a lager, especially something like a Czech Pilz, the balance of malt and hops requires getting the bitterness right without overpowering flavor and aroma from fragrant hops.
     

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