Final fermentation

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #188080, Sep 25, 2018.

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Final fermentation

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  1. RIBrewer

    RIBrewer New Member

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    Hello everyone

    I am an absolute beginner in brewing and I'd love to, if someone wants to or can, to help me with a couple of obscurities of final fermentation. In what kind of pots takes place the final fermentation of beer? Whether these containers should be under pressure for it to keep the CO2? Can I open pots during fermentation of beer or pour out that I can check the FG, layout, color? How much pressure is necessary to maintain in pots for fermentation? When the fermentation is finished, do I filter out the beer from yeast directly in bottle or other container? If pots it's not a under pressure , what happens to the CO2 created, whether it retains in beer or not? If I lose my CO2 during fermentation, can I do something to fix it?

    Thank You in advance

    Darko
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Primary fermentation happens in a fermentation bucket with lid and an air lock inserted in lid. Maybe read John Palmers "how to brew" book to get an understanding of the brewing process and basic equipment needed.

    Secondary fermentation is in the capped bottle where co2 produced is retained in the beer to give it carbonation.
    Good luck with the brewing have a look at the book for a bit of a crash course in brewing beer.:)
     
  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    You can also use the website of the same name. It's quite a bit shorter than the book but has most of the essential content.
     
  4. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    It is seldom the case that any fermentation other than bottle-carbonation takes place under pressure. You may assume that you can and should fully ferment the beer with no pressure, but keeping your vessel closed at all times unless it is absolutely necessary to open it. A couple of gravity samples very late in fermentation will usually be enough to tell if it is finished.
    When all fermentation is done, the beer is racked from the fermenting vessel, leaving all the sediment intact and is mixed with a small amount of sugar and transferred to capped bottles so that a small amount of further fermentation will provide the CO2 needed to carbonate the beer.
    When you are much further along in your learning process, you can explore fermenting under pressure to retain CO2 using a pressure-tight vessel and a spunding valve which is an adjustable pressure release valve. For now, keep it simple.
     
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  5. RIBrewer

    RIBrewer New Member

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    Thank You very mach.

    I know my questions are to simple for You, but if someone can to explain me my next confusion.

    If, after the primary fermentation, the beer is transferred to bottles and I add little sugar for carbonization do I have a precipitation in bottles after the fermentation is over? When I pour beer in bottles, do I filter it to remove residue and do I have enough yeast in the carbonization bottles then?
    Can I, after primary fermentation, extract a quantity of beer that has not been filtered and stored in a refrigerator and mixed with a filtered beer that is separate from the precipitate and this part of unfiltered beer can be as a carbonation starter in bottles or barrels.

    Many thanks in advance
     
  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    After primary fermentation is done the yeast will start settling out of suspension that's called Floculation once gravity is stable over 3 days you bottle as a beginner use a simple sugar to prime your bottles like Raw sugar. Use the priming calculator on this site to find out how much grams of priming sugar you'll need to reach desired carbonation level. You dont need to filter your beers before bottling all that cloudy sediment in suspension (some most likely yeast) will settle over time. Chilling down the fermentor and cold crashing it will help drop some solids before bottling.

    I think what your trying to get at was using some raw wort to prime with? I know some brewers here do this so their better to answer this one. Cheers hope that is helpful.
     

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