Dumb Question?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by KM. Corbin, Jul 1, 2017.

  1. KM. Corbin

    KM. Corbin New Member

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    This will be my second batch of all grain i am attempting. First batch went off without a hitch until I bottled. I either put to much priming sugar in or it got an infection because it was way over carbonated, (bottle bombs). Very much used to the extract method of brewing, so not sure if priming sugar is even needed in all grain? (I am guessing It is, I just had a bad calculation and put way to much in.)
     
  2. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Yes, you need to use priming sugar for all grain. The third possibility is that you bottled before fermentation was complete. Make sure hydrometer readings don't change for 3 days.
     
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  3. KM. Corbin

    KM. Corbin New Member

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    Thanks, exactly what I had thought as well. Hydrometer had the same reading for 4 days straight. was the only reason I felt comfortable enough to bottle.

    In the end I will chalk it up to experience. the beer was great outside of being entirely over carbonated.

    will take extra precautions when cleaning and sterilizing equipment and will double triple check the measurements of all ingredients. just had me a bit frustrated after brewing extracts for a number of years, and never having any issues with carbonation. Then a switch to all grain and i go bottle bombs.

    Thanks for the reply. it is appreciated.
     
  4. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    How much priming sugar did you use? When I bottled, I used 5 oz every time (5 gallon batch).
     
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    If you had steady readings but they were higher than expected, you could have had a stuck fermentation. Some yeasts will stall and then restart once they're roused up (e.g. during transfer for bottling). That said, even a little infection with wild yeast or a sour bug can make things exciting. We've all had that at one time or another. It gets better. You'll find the reason for this one and guard against it in future batches. ;)
     
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  6. CRUNK

    CRUNK Well-Known Member

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    No question is a dumb question
     
  7. Gledison

    Gledison Active Member

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    Hey, worried about bottle bombs i´ve built a simple Manometer in a 500ml coke bottle. For an Pale ale average of 2,5 volumes CO2 should be ca 29 psi at 65° F (http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php). on Bottle day i will fill all bottles with the calculated sugar amount and the "reference bottle". if starts to go higher than 35-40 psi, maybe ist time to give a little release on the bottles :S

    rsz_manometer_bottle.jpg
     
  8. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

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    When I bottled I had zero bombs using the brewersfriend calculator and putting the table sugar in the bottle bucket while gently stirring.
     
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  9. Myndflyte

    Myndflyte Active Member

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    How long did you let it ferment? My thought is that the readings may have been steady but like someone suggested, maybe it just got stuck.
     

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