Dry Yeast Info.

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by BOB357, Jun 18, 2018.

  1. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Here's a podcast that outlines improvements in active dry yeast. Very interesting: Under Master Brewers Podcast in iTunes.

    093: Active Dry Yeast 27:00 6/17/2018 Kevin Lane & Marcelo Cerdan discuss several studies examining shelf-life, performance, and consistency of Active Dry Yeast (ADY) vs Freshly Propagated Yeast (FPY). We also explore the application of ADY for bottle conditioning and more. This... 0
     
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  2. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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  3. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    As a brewer that really only uses dry yeast, i really liked the info they presented
     
  4. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    One of our local breweries that I really like has gone dry yeast too which has made me rethink my crazy rabbit hole of yeast strains. I should seriously stop trying to have every strain under the sun and run with 2-4 main yeasts.
     
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  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I just have to draw the line at some things I mean I paid thousands for my brewery but I wont pay $36 for a batch of wet yeast, its just the principle, my grain bill is less than $30 and I buy hops in bulk very cheap so in most cases its less than $5 per batch, I don't think my yeast should cost more than the rest and have a shelf life so that's why I've tried all the dry yeast out there many times for different beers, I've come up with a winner for ales and lagers that's very versatile and I can store them forever if needed vacuum packed, so its's just a no brainier for me to go fry ;)
     
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  6. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Holy hell, you're paying that for yeast? I pay $10 a pack here.
     
  7. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    that's for 3, wait I meant 6 in a 18 gallon brew
     
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  8. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Ah ok that makes sense. I reuse yeast pretty heavily so the cost isn't a big factor for me, but I end up having an unmanageable number of strains kicking around.
     
  9. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I don’t think I’ve ever paid more than $7 for yeast.
     
  10. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I've found that the cheapest dry yeast I can get has all but become a house strain for me...below 60 it's nearly lager clean, low-mid-60's it's fruity, 70s+ and it's a spicy Belgian. I'll keep experimenting with it but so far, it's given me some very nice brews and a couple of award-winners.
     
  11. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    I use US05 and Notty 99% of the time.....
    I am looking into some of the Mangrove Jack yeast to start developing my beer just a little more, but I don't see me ever using more than 3 or 4 different yeast
     
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  12. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I end up thinking I need whatever yeast is referenced in a recipe.
     
  13. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I've tried the Saison and the Belgian Wit, both with extremely good results. ;)
     
  14. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'm finding that by limiting my choices, I make better beer.
     
  15. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    As posted a couple of months ago, I got tired of paying $8 for dated yeast, so went back to dry yeast. I have been pleasantly surprised at the results. Although adamant on rehydration, after listening to this podcast I may just go to direct pitching into most worts. Will still rehydrate and then do appropriate starters for brews that require more than a single packet.
     
  16. Michael_biab

    Michael_biab Member

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    I've also had great performance from dried yeasts like Nottingham, Safale US05 and US04. Not having to make a starter for most beers is a huge benefit over liquid yeasts, in time savings and decreased risk of contamination, and the lower cost is a bonus. It just is simpler and I've found that over the years simpler is better for me. I enjoy the ease of rehydrating and dumping, and I think I brew more because of it.

    I became a convert after listening to a regular podcast called Brewnology whose hosts swear by it. When I started brewing in the early 1990s, my LHBS was pretty adamant about using liquid yeasts but I was always a bit skeptical about that because they have an incentive to up-sell you into a more expensive ingredient. Maybe back then they could make a case over the dried yeast that comes in a kit, but now I think it's much more difficult case to make.

    I agree with Nosybear. When I limit my choices (in yeast) I make better beer. When I simplify my process, I think I also make better beer and I enjoy it more.
     
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  17. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    I must be one of the odd balls. I think dry yeast makes good beer, but liquid yeast gives me better results. I use dry yeast as a back up and when I want to get a quick brew out I use dry yeast. When I want to knock one out of the park, I always go back to liquid.

    Dry yeast is selected for it's ability to survive the dehydration process. If a yeast can't survive the dehydration, it's only available in liquid form. I use WLP830 a lot and when I make beer with it's dry yeast equivalent, 34/70, it's good but not as clean and malty as 830.

    If i had to pick one strain it would be Wyeast 1007, it's a very versatile yeast. Everything from Kolsch, Alt, pale ale, IPA, cream ale, mock German lagers, etc. There is no dry yeast equivalent, the closest is K97 and it's not as clean, way too fruity.
     
  18. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    This for the WIN
     
  19. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Dry yeast strains are the same organisms as their liquid counterparts, having been banked from the same culture. While there may be some small amount of generation mutation that differs according to process, it's basically the same.
    As for the results with 34/70, have you ever tried a brew using the second generation or doing a starter the way you would with the liquid version. I think you might be surprised with the results. I've always gotten solid results with the first pitch, rehydrated, but definitely better with the second pitch.
     
  20. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    The way I have normally used 34/70 is with a starter. Even with the starter, I pick up a faint lemon character, not exactly my favorite flavor in a German Pils. With 830, you have watch your pitch temps to avoid pear/white grape esters, Doesn’t seem to be a problem with 34/70. 34/70 is also drier and less malty. 830 can come across as sweet and very malty.

    34/70 is not a bad yeast, but the claims that they are exactly the same seems to fall short if you brew a lot of lagers with both strains.
     
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