Cream Ale v. Blonde Ale

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Kleczd65, Feb 10, 2018.

  1. Kleczd65

    Kleczd65 New Member

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    Blonde ale + Lactose = Cream Ale?
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    #2 Trialben, Feb 10, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
    cream ale is a corn - wheat - unmalted barley type beer lite bodied beer maybe throw some rice in to boot. ive brewed but one cream ale sticks vanilla cream ale. try Ozarks Blondie youll be impressed:p! my tweeked version below. maybe the recipie creator can flick a link to his very own.

    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/550872/blondie

    see pic for inspiration..
    20180210_181727.jpg
     
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Cream ale is a misnomer. There's no "creaminess" to it - it's basically the same as an American Lager. I prefer to brew mine with a little more mouthfeel which I get by offsetting the high percentage of (body-thinning) corn with a dextrin rest and yeast selection.
    It's a style sometimes used as a base for different flavors like orange and vanilla, but at it's best, it's a straight-up grain and hops sort of beer. If I call my cream ale something else, most people like it better. It's very odd.
    Here's an excerpt from the BJCP:
    History:
    A sparkling or present-use ale that existed in the1800s and survived prohibition. An ale version of the American lager style. Produced by ale brewers to compete with lager brewers in Canada and the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Midwest states. Originally known as sparkling or present use ales, lager strains were (and sometimes still are) used by some brewers, but were not historically mixed with ale strains. Many examples are kräusened to achieve carbonation. Cold conditioning isn’t traditional, although modern brewers sometimes use it.
    Characteristic Ingredients:
    American ingredients most commonly used. A grain bill of six -row malt, or a combination of six-row and North American two-row, is common. Adjuncts can include up to 20% maize in the mash, and up to 20% glucose or other sugars in the boil. Any variety of hops can be used for bittering and finishing.
    Style Comparison:
    Similar to a Standard American Lager,
    but with more character.
     
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  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    a blond ale cream ale or golden ale are all the same thing, something thats on my website says

    One of the most approachable styles, a blonde or Cream ale is an easy-drinking beer that is visually appealing and has no particularly dominating malt or hop characteristics. Rounded and smooth, it is an American classic known for its simplicity. Sometimes referred to as “golden ale.” , and may be fermented with lager or ale yeast.
     
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  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Quite simply, it's an American light lager fermented with ale yeast at ale temperatures, well, maybe a little cooler.
     
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  6. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I brew mine with a little more European Pilsner-malty character and hop profile, but when I submitted a well-lagered "session" version of it for a club competition, some of the guys swore somebody had snuck in a ringer and it was the best Coors Light they'd ever tasted. :D:D
    I usually think of Blonde Ales as having a slightly more light caramel flavor in the malt and definitely leaning toward American NW or maybe English-cross or nobel-cross hops like Willamette, Crystal, Sterling, sometimes juiced up with a little Cascade, Centennial, Amarillo, etc.
     
  7. Kleczd65

    Kleczd65 New Member

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    I went with:

    Peanut BEERter Blonde Ale


    Fermentables :
    2.5lbs - American pale 2 row
    .5lbs - Honey malt
    .5lbs - White Wheat

    Hops:
    .25oz Mt. Hood - 60 minutes

    Additions:
    Irish moss
    3oz - P2 powder - boil 5 minutes
    .75oz PB Extract
     
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  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Looks like a great starting point to me! I'd lose the extract and increase the powder - extracts usually taste rather fake to me - but your recipe looks like a great platform to develop a peanut beer from. Since this looks like a gallon test batch - have you considered doing extract? I use it for test batches and it saves me some time.
     
  9. Kleczd65

    Kleczd65 New Member

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    I’m going to To both just to make sure I get the flavor. I’m just experimenting with 1gal batches to get my feet wet with all grain
     
  10. Kleczd65

    Kleczd65 New Member

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  11. Gledison

    Gledison Active Member

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    ohhh, this is indeed a nice Head! :) I´ve read that barley flakes can help with head Retention..ist it really true?
     
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  12. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    If a mash is done properly with most any malt head retention won't be a problem. A little CaraPils is helpful if you're not confident of your mashing scheduld. Flaked Barley can add body but you wouldn't necessarily want to bulk up a lighter beer like a Cream Ale. It's used a lot in bigger beers like stouts and porters and is great in a Pale or IPA.
     
  13. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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  14. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    It's negligible isn't it? I haven't used it for a few brews now and so far head retention has been fine will see about upcoming Pilsner. I give most mashes a high 71ish C dextrin rest to Finnish it off I'm believing this is helping with body and head retention:rolleyes:.
     
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  15. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I've started adding some carapils, particularly to my German beers. Can't tell a difference in either flavor or head retention.
     
  16. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I might put some in some recipes for the next bit, but mostly because I have most of a kilo of it just sitting there.
     

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