Cold crashing - during and after...

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Gledison, Oct 4, 2017.

  1. Gledison

    Gledison Active Member

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    Hi everyone.
    I found several threads on cold crashing but it seems that People do in several ways (temperature, time, etc..)
    I´ve noticed that after my last cold crashing, after i left the beer to reach room temperature (20 °C), Co2 started to be pushed out and the trub was a Little disturbed.
    I have no choice, i Need to move the Fermenter out of the Fridge for bottling.
    Shall i leave the beer to settle again longer (1-2 days) in order to get a clearer beer ? Or ist not a good idea to bring it back to room temperature? Im assuming that the yeast and hops dissolved in the beer will precipitated due to lower solubility at low temperatures. However, the yeast will dissolve back in the beer right? what about the hop particulates, the same?
    thanks for any tip :)
     
  2. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I've just now been able to cold crash, so take this with a grain of salt. I transfer to a bottling bucket or keg immediately after pulling the carboy from the fridge. I try to be as careful as possible to not shake it up when I move it, but I don't worry too much about it.
    I'm still fiddling with how much priming sugar to use since the beer fermented and cold crashed at different temperatures. Haven't opened any of those bottles yet to see
    As for the yeast, it's virtually impossible to take all the yeast out unless you filter it. There will still be some yeast in suspension, so no need to add any more at bottling time
     
  3. Gledison

    Gledison Active Member

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    Cool, let me know how it goes :)
    im dont really want to remove the yeast completely. i just want to have a decent Sedimentation . I was also very carefull when removing the Fermenter out of the fridge. The Problem was that by let it reach the room temperature, Co2 was released destroying a Little the nice Sedimentation. My big question is: if i let it set at the room temperature after cold crashing for ?? days, will i get Back the good Sedimentation?
    cheers
     
  4. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Id imagine itd settle a bit, but not nearly as nicely as when it was cold crashed. Plus youre waiting a few more days to package it, might disrupt ypur beer pipeline:)
    I should mention I typically use a secondary too. 2 cold crashes and minimal jostling, and she's clear
     
  5. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Out of curiosity, do you use Irish moss, gelatin, or other finings? That could help keep things clumped and settled too
     
  6. Gledison

    Gledison Active Member

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    lets say yes...but i forgot irish moss this time. However i was reading this brulosophy Topic (http://brulosophy.com/2015/03/16/the-irish-moss-effect-exbeeriment-results/) and most of the People didnt realy find differences between with x no irish moss.
    However, one can clearly see the differences during the Primary Fermentation (strong sedimentaion by using irish moss).
    Interesting Experiment!
     
  7. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Haha, right. Honestly, I still have the same bottle from when I started brewing 5 years ago. Don't know why I suddenly wanted to try it again, but we'll see how the beer turns out
     
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  8. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I find that once the beer is good and cold and has cleared, the trub settles back very quickly after it's jostled in the process of moving to a higher surface for racking. Unless I've been really sloppy about moving it around, there's not much disturbance to begin with. As I'm racking off, I'll keep the siphon held about half-way up in the carboy and move it down as the level drops. By the time I've gotten to the last of it, everything has dropped back to the bottom and it's all fairly clear and clean.
    Whether it's going into a keg or bottling bucket, whatever you pick up from the bottom will stir into suspension and have to drop back out anyway. No matter how clear the beer is going into the keg, it takes a week or so in the keg before it's really running clear and there's always a substantial layer of gunk at the bottom when I clean an empty.
     
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