10 Min boil?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Brewer #87252, Feb 12, 2017.

  1. Ryanhuddo

    Ryanhuddo New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Australia
    Evening all,

    I am new to the home brewing game, on my 2nd batch, 1st turned out really well and I am hooked :p

    Anyway I went down to my local home brew shop and got an extract recipe kit, the instructions where to add the extract as the water heats up and stir, once it hits a boil add the hops and maintain a rolling boil for 10 minutes, following this kill the heat and cool it down to pitch the yeast.

    Everywhere I have been looking online I haven't seen a 10 minute boil, mostly 60 minute, is this batch ruined before I even get to bottle it? are there pro's and con's to a lower boil time or its recipe dependent?

    Another quick question, reading different recipes I have notices adding hops at 0mins, or flame off, when doing this how long do you leave the hops in before cooling/during cooling?

    Thank you, Ryan
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    theres all types of brewing processes out there, nothing wrong with the 10 minute extract boil if its a mellow hopped beer, the longer boil is mainly to remove DMS and for hop bitters, I have a good recipe similar that Ive brewed and liked very well

    hops at flame out need to soak while you stir every so often until the temperature naturally lowers to any temp above infection temps which are roughly 80F to 150ishF, I personally stay above 165 my self but just as a beginner I wouldn't try it yet, get e few easy beers under your belt then move up to avoid mistakes, I would avoid dry hopping too for a time, good luck :)
     
    Brewer #87252 likes this.
  3. Myndflyte

    Myndflyte Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2016
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    59
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Is the malt extract already hopped? It would make sense then that you are just adding some flavor/aroma hops while all the bitterness is already in the malt extract.
     
    Brewer #87252 likes this.
  4. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Not heard of any recipes that ask for boiling a pre hopped extract .

    Were there 2 cans in the kit ? One gets boiled and other added directly to the fermentation vessel
     
    Brewer #87252 and J A like this.
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    just add your hops in cold water, bring to a boil, wait 10 or 15 minutes then chill, its a good session beer and it works, you need more hops to do this than normal like bittering and finish hops put together
     
    Brewer #87252 likes this.
  6. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,480
    Likes Received:
    2,699
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    There are different types of extracts. Hopped Malt Extract (HME) is malt syrup with hop extract for bitterness. Liquid Malt Extact (LME) is just malt syrup that ranges from extra light to dark. Dry Malt Extract (DME) is powered malt sugar that you dissolve in boiling water.
    Most kits have HME and that's not necessarily boiled at all but added as the flame is turned out. DME and HME can be boiled with hops for any length of time to extract hop flavor and bitterness. Simple kits are just a can of HME that's not boiled at all or just brought to a boil to sterilize. More complex kits may have steeping grains and DME or LME for boiling hops 10 to 20 minutes and HME for addition at the end of the boil.
    Full boil extract brewing is exactly like all-grain brewing minus the mashing stage. Mashing is done to convert sugars and produce a large volume of wort which is a relatively weak sugar solution. That's boiled down to concentrate the sugars and to drive off some undesireable components from the malted grain. LME or DME or a combination can be used to produce a certain volume of wort at just about any concentration and hops can be utilized as they usually are - boiled for 60 minutes for bitterness with later additions to enhance flavor and aroma.
    Hope that's informative and not too long-winded.
    Welcome to the fray. If you think you're hooked now, just wait until you start steeping and experimenting with your own recipes and then taking the step into all-grain brewing. :)
     
    Brewer #87252 and Trialben like this.
  7. Ryanhuddo

    Ryanhuddo New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Australia
    Thank you all for your replies :)
    I have learnt more from these posts than I have from hours of google searches!

    I used Coopers Lager, I assume its a HME? I also used a "Ultra Brew" i got from my local home brew shop, it came in a powder form and I had to add it before it the water came to a boil so given the info above I assume its a DME? Judging from the info here I would say my batch is ok then, I have about a week to go, I have it sitting at 12 degrees Celsius and I was told it would be able 3 weeks before the gravity will settle and I can bottle.

    I would like to get another batch going as soon as I bottle the current one, I am tipping towards a pale ale or since its still very warm here in Australia maybe a nice crisp lager? I would like to try and step it up a little, try a recipe that involves steeping grains or if thats to advanced for my 3rd go adding hops to different stages of the boil. Does anyone have any recipes they would suggest :)

    Also I would like to know if there is an importance to how quickly you cool down your wart before adding the yest? My current batch I added my wort to the fermenter and topped it up, I then put it my fridge (spare fridge with a temperature controller) and cooled it down over night to 18 degrees Celsius before pitching the yeast. Does this cause any warm its not really a drama?

    Thank you
     
  8. Ryanhuddo

    Ryanhuddo New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Australia
  9. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Making a Coopers pale clone ?
    My friend ....only way to get even close is with Cooper's yeast from a bottle , I've been trying to brew a decent clone for over a year and I'm only getting close now with all grain and the right yeast .

    Getting wort down to a little above ferment temp before pitching isn't always a bad thing , get it to 22°C then pitch yeast while fridge is chilling to ferment temp .
     
    Ryanhuddo likes this.
  10. Ryanhuddo

    Ryanhuddo New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Australia
    Really? haha thats a shame I got excited :p I'll look for another recipe then.

    So cool it down to 22, but does it matter how fast/slow I cool the wort down? does it effect the chemistry in any way? I have noticed allot of techniques involve cooling it rapidly, and I am not sure if that's because you just want to get your batch fermenting quicker or because its more beneficial for the wort?

    Like I said last batch I cooled it in the fridge but it took hours so I went to bed and pitched it when I woke up (at 18°c) then set the temp on the fridge to 12°c for fermenting
     
  11. Ryanhuddo

    Ryanhuddo New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Australia
    https://brewerschoice.com.au/shop/b...ck/best-british-bitter-extract/#configuration

    Another question, in this recipe it has you add hops at the start and at the end (this may seem like a stupid question) but the instructions doesn't say to remove the hops from the wort before fermenting, is this just to be expected (removing the hops when pitching)? the only reason I ask is because my first batch the recipe called for me to add hops on day 4 of the ferment so it doesn't seem wrong to keep them in? Or is it general practice any hops used in a boil needs to be removed?
     
  12. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Firstly the reason most brewers chill quickly is twofold .
    1 : it drops proteins formed during the boil out of suspension ( cold break )
    2 :contact time of hops to high temps where bitterness is extracted ( bitterness and harsh flavours )

    There are methods for dealing with both of these depending on what equipment you use and the result you're after
     
    Ryanhuddo likes this.
  13. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Where are you based ? Can brew much cheaper than you are buying if you know where to shop
     
  14. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,474
    Likes Received:
    9,564
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Sounds like you might want to invest in a Imersion chiller or the like there Ryan that way you can chill down your wort quicker and therefore get that yeast munching on them sugars quicker too.

    I've left wort in fermentor over night and pitched the yeast next day. I was brewing a lager and was pitching 12c but I could only chill wort to about 26c. But the quicker you get the yeast in there the quicker they out compete any nasties that could cause off tastes in your beer.

    Sounds like your starting out on this awesome hobbie mate cheers good luck and don't hesitate to ask any questions were here to help you brew better beer:p. That way if you do live nearby I can drink some too:D.
     
  15. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2015
    Messages:
    3,240
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Get yourself a Hydra immersion chiller, made by Jaded. It's capable of chilling a 5 gallon batch in about 4 minutes. It chills to 140°F in 45 seconds. I have one. One of the few products I've ever encountered that works as advertised.
     
    Trialben likes this.
  16. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,480
    Likes Received:
    2,699
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Those Coopers kits come with an ale yeast or a yeast blend as far as I know. If the directions say to ferment at 12C then it's not their standard ale yeast. the Ultra Brew would have been a mix of DME, dextrose and corn sugar. I assume that didn't come with the kit and you added it.
    Without more information as to the exact ingredients you used or yeast you pitched, it's hard to say how it might turn out. You won't know it's ready to bottle for sure until you do a gravity check. If you don't have a hydrometer, you should get one.

    As for what to brew in the future, do some research into building your own (simple) recipes, learn to use the calculator and start buying DME, LME, hop pellets and proper yeast (dry yeasts are quite good for almost anything you want to brew). Start using some steeping Crystal and specialty grains (it's not mashing, and it's not complicated). If you local store is properly staffed, you should be able to get lots of help and advice.
    Good luck!
     
    Trialben likes this.
  17. Ryanhuddo

    Ryanhuddo New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Australia
    Ah thanks guys,

    I was looking into a chiller, might be my next investment, do they connect to you tap, it looks like you need a special connection? Yeah the yeast I bought separate to the kit.

    I was keen on slightly more harder recipe to keep learning :) heading to the brew shop tomorrow. Also I am located on the Gold Coast, QLD and I work in Brisbane, I heard there is a really good Brew shop somewhere on the West side?

    Update to my batch. It has been three weeks since I put it down, I open the fridge every now and then to look at it or check the gravity and I haven't noticed any co2 release, is this because a lager will ferment much slower and I just miss the burping? Also my gravity has barely changed at all since the OG, the picture attached is from last night. Should I just drink a glass to see if it has fermented properly haha?
     

    Attached Files:

  18. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Catch me up here mate , this brew used a coopers lager can with the supplied yeast ?
    The yeast supplied with the can is straight ale yeast .....goes to sleep below 16 °C .
    The Euro lager can however comes with what many suspect to be S-23 Lager yeast and works very well at 12-15 °C .

    You don't need to buy a chiller until you move to full volume boils , whether they be extract or all grain .
    With a kit you can use 5 litres hot water to dissolve kit and extra sugars and top up with cool water to 18 then add ice or warm water to get pitching temp quickly .

    I should have been paying closer attention to this thread and would have helped you earlier , for future reference here's a chart showing what yeasts are supplied with Cooper's kits
    https://club.coopers.com.au/coopers-forum/topic/14826/
     
  19. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,474
    Likes Received:
    9,564
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    I see Capalaba has a good homebrew store there Ryan seem to do all grain supplies too I'd be hitting them up if I lived down your way. I'm on the sunny coast
    https://www.craftbrewer.com.au
     
    Ryanhuddo likes this.
  20. Ryanhuddo

    Ryanhuddo New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Australia
    I didn't use the supplied yeast, I used Saflager s-23 dry yeast lager, however thinking back now I did read that the instructions on the yeast packet called for two packets worth based on the batch size I think (I can't recall the exact details), I called the home brew shop and the bloke told me it will be fine, would it just take twice as long? I have the fridge sitting at the correct temperate, or could it be it has fermented fine and the gravity reading isn't accurate?
     

Share This Page

arrow_white