Yeast info

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Vallka, Aug 4, 2017.

  1. Vallka

    Vallka Well-Known Member

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    OK, this topic has probably been beat to death for years, but I'll ask again. I'm new to break down a few all grain batches that it turned out very well. Now I want to take another step. Yeast, my next batch calls for just over 200 billion cells but the snack pack only has 100 billion. Can someone point me in the direction of a good YouTube video or article that can help me turn 1 billion into 2 billion cells.
    ( oh and if you could do this with cash as well I do going to look at that article )
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    just curious what size is your batch and what’s the starting gravity
     
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Simple starter...pitch the yeast in a couple of liters of 1.032 sterilized wort (no hops) in a clean beaker or jar with foil over the top. Shake it up a few times over 18 to 24 hours and let it ferment out. When it stops, put it in the fridge and cool it down so that the yeast settles to the bottom. Pour off the liquid and pitch the yeast in your 5 gallons of wort.
    You can get more complicated than that in a number of ways, but that's all that's really necessary.
     
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  4. Vallka

    Vallka Well-Known Member

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    I'm brewing 23 Liters or 6.?? US Gallons, this upcoming Amber Ale should be 1.049 OG
    Been using MongoIPA's Excel worksheet......it is amazing

    Hey thank for the help guy's/gal's much appreciated
    Troy
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    for that amount you don't really need 2000 cells just use 1 pack you'll be fine, its kind of on the border of 1 vs 2 packs but a good starter will do it, I really gave up on adding more than 1 pack on anything under 1060, I've always had good luck, since 1 pack will take a day or 2 longer to replicate, you need a day or 2 longer to ferment
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    The snack pack has 100 billion cells only? :) Okay, here's where I wander off into one of my favorite topics, brulosophy. They did a pitch rate test and the testers could find no difference between the normal pitch and the "underpitched" batches. I don't consider Brulosophy definitive brewing science but it's instructive at our scale. But a couple of things are going on here where homebrewing doesn't quite match what the big boys, source of most of the science, do:
    1. We usually pitch fresh yeast (okay, I know many of us keep yeast from one batch to the next). The numbers in the calculator are based on repitched yeast. Ours, particularly if we do a starter, are a lot more vital and ready to do their job.
    2. We don't control things as closely. There are warm spots and cool spots in the fermentor, particularly if you're not measuring the temperature of the beer itself. So your yeast is probably working warmer than the tests would indicate.
    3. The higher cell counts might not be needed anyway. The difference between 100 billion cells and 200 billion cells when dealing with the kind of growth we get in a fermentor is about 20 minutes, or the time it takes a generation of yeast to reproduce. With enough nutrition and enough initial oxygen, the yeast will take care of themselves.
    4. The only difference between growing your money, say in an investment, and growing yeast is the rate of growth.
    That said, I generally do starters for anything above 1.055 or any lager. It seems a bit safer and it's cheap. A yeast starter won't exactly double the cell count but it will get it into a range where even the calculators say you're good. I'll be picking up DME this afternoon to do a starter for my Mexican Dunkel, to be brewed Sunday....
     
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