Ward water report confusion

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by TiKi BrEwErY, Apr 23, 2020.

  1. TiKi BrEwErY

    TiKi BrEwErY New Member

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    I live in Land o lakes Florida and just got my water report. I've been brewing extract and then biab for a few years. The wife bought me a robobrew and I did a haze craze neipa with it. I used ro water and added 1tsp gypsum, 2 tsp calcium chloride and 5 tsp of 5.2 ph stabilizer. That was before reading up on brewing water. I sent for my water report and this is the result.

    Ph 8.1
    TDS 301
    Sodium, Na 43
    Potassium 2
    Calcium 66.6
    Magnesium 6
    Total hardness, CaCO3 193
    Nitrate, NO3-N 0.3
    Sulfate, SO4-S 21
    Chloride 31
    Carbonate CO3 <1.0 not detected
    Bicarbonate, HCO3 202
    Total Alkalinity, CaCO3 168
    Fluoride 0.34
    Iron <0.01 not detected

    I have read about the conversions that need to be done with some of the numbers.
    When I put this into the water calculator I use 9 gallons because that will be my total water treated including the sparge which I will use to bring me to pre boil volume.
    I am looking for advice on what to add so I can have a list specific amount of things to add for whatever style I'm going to brew.
    What I would like to do is run a potable water hose from my tap through a charcoal filter and use just that.

    On a side note, how long would a Carboy of ro water stay good in 80 degree garage if I put foil over the top?
     
  2. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    If your city water is treated with chlorine, or chloramine you need to deal with that first.
    Your home brew shop will have campden tablets, that will deal with the chlorine.
    If you go to the water calculator here and punch in the numbers you have there as you source water, you can add "salts" (calcium chloride, gypsum, etc.) to get to your desired water profile. Different profiles for different styles of beer.
    Water is water, there is no new or old water. All the water that is on this planet has always been here. Water doesn't go bad.
    Under the right conditions things can grow in water though.
    If you're not sure dump it, water is relatively cheap.
    Some consider water treatment to be a rabbit hole unto itself, but it isn't really all that complicated once you do some research.
    Good luck!
     
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  3. Megary

    Megary Well-Known Member

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    Like Craigerr says, first take care of any chlorine or chloramine with a Campden tablet.

    Without dilution your water looks fine for dark beers like stouts and porters. Beyond those styles, you might be best served by diluting your water 50-50 with RO. Otherwise you are going to need either Lactic or Phosphoric acid to get your mash pH down in the 5.3-5.4 range for lighter beer styles. Your main brewing ions look fine with only the chloride a little low. If you dilute, I can imagine you using Calcium Chloride or Sodium Chloride (non-iodized table salt) quite often.

    For your inventory, I would keep on hand (all pretty cheap stuff):
    An acid of your choice
    CaCl
    NaCl (not iodized)
    Gypsum (CaSO4)

    The software on this site is very easy to use. Best of luck. You'll get the hang of it after the first beer.
     
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  4. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
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    You live in Land o'Lakes? I live in Crystal River (actually, Ozello) from November- April. So we're practically neighbors!

    With the high alkalinity (bicarbonate) there, you'll need to dilute lower that quite a bit for most beer styles. For lighter colored beer styles, you'll probably need to dilute 75% with RO or use quite a bit of phosphoric acid to reduce the pH. Make sure that you have a mash pH of 5.2-5.5 in the calculator.

    Ditch that 5.2 stabilizer- it won't work for you with that water and may leave an aftertaste that is unpleasant.
     
  5. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Tiki
    You can use pickling salt, it is not iodized, dirt cheap too.
    Cheers
     
  6. TiKi BrEwErY

    TiKi BrEwErY New Member

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    Thanks for the replies.
    I guess the easiest way would be diluting with ro. The market near me sells it and right down the street from aford-a-brew. So my brew day could start with buying my grains, stopping at market for water then home to brew.
    I bought a 5 gallon cooler to hold my sparge water and I was thinking about heating a full volume in the robobrew then pumping 4 gallons to the cooler for sparging. Then adding water to the robobrew to get me to my mash volume if I had to.
    I like the idea of diluting my tap water to get alkalinity in range then adding the other additions to match my desired style.
    I will mess with the water calculator some more and write down some profile baselines to start with.
     
  7. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    If your numbers are bad for a type there isn't much to do but dilute. I use just straight city water and let it buck but I'm a bit of a wildcard.
    Also, Edmonton water is pretty good for messing with.
     
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