Temperatures priming

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by okoncentrerad, Nov 30, 2017.

  1. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    Been looking at the priming calculator and I got a couple of question on this topic.

    If cold crashing, it says "if you cold crash for a very long time"....what is a "very long time" in this context?

    After priming (bottles), is there bad/good temperatures for storing the beer waiting for the CO2 process to do its work?

    And not priming related....what's a good temperature to store beer in waiting for consumption?
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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  3. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    Thanks, yes it turns out I've been storing my bottles too chilly after priming.. I have them stored at 13-14C (55-57 F)
     
  4. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    "A long time" would be most if not all the yeast has dropped out of suspension. At that point adding some dry yeast (1/4 to 1/2 pack) to the beer before bottling will reintroduce some yeast. Nottingham is used for that quite often because it has a high alcohol tolerance and it will form a tight cake on the bottom of the bottle when it's done.

    When waiting for the beer to carbonate if bottle conditioning, I have found 70-75 F will produce the fastest carbonation. Shaking it up occasionally and rousing the yeast will speed it up as well. It will usually be done in 1 week or so.

    After it's carbonated, in most cases, storing it at 33 F is best to prevent oxidation and it will clear the beer in the bottle.
     
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  5. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    48 hours at 0C/32F, does that qualify as long? Or are there still enough happy yeast cells in the beer to produce CO2?
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Can't tell without doing a count but hey, bright beer still has a million cells per milliliter, I've never had problems with a lager carbonating so go for it.
     
  7. thehaze

    thehaze Active Member

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    48 hours is not long. You will not have any issues with bottle carbonation for beers up to 8-9%.

    I usually cold crush for 2-3 days and have no problems with beers up to 9.2% ( latest Imperial Stout ).
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I've not had problems with beers above that. As my good friend Horst says, all it takes is one cell and time.
     
  9. okoncentrerad

    okoncentrerad Active Member

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    Sounds good to me :)
     
  10. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    #10 HighVoltageMan!, Dec 1, 2017
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2017
    2-3 days at 32F will not drop out enough yeast to worry about. 2 to 3 weeks there may still be enough yeast, but to speed the process up and insure it will carbonate, add some yeast back into the beer if you have any doubts. I recently had to carbonate a beer for a friend who was unable to carbonate in the bottle. I had to pour them into a keg and force carbonate it. I wouldn't recommend that process because of oxygen ingress and infection problems, but it worked.

    Beer that has been lagered for 4 weeks or longer (and had finings added) and is brilliantly polished (super clear) will have very little yeast in it. At that point it may be better to keg it. You don't have add yeast or worry about it carbonating. Flat beer sucks.
     
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