Red Racer Clone(Help if you can or want to).

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Steve21, Sep 8, 2018.

  1. Steve21

    Steve21 Member

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    Okay so I've never cloned a beer, so I'll get that out of the way right off the hop(pun fully intended)
    But in Vancouver years ago I had Red Racers Amber ale on tap, it was honestly one of my favorite beers at the time. I haven't had it since 2010 and most likely wont again unless I brew it myself. So with that being said I'm tossing it out there for people who have had it to help change this recipe in an attempt to make a really good clone.
    I've included what I have so far and made the recipe public in my profile.
    I have included though the company's ingredients and taste profile.
    Screenshot_20180908-091858_Chrome.jpg Screenshot_20180908-091904_Chrome.jpg
    Brew Method: All Grain
    Style Name: Irish Red Ale
    Boil Time: 60 min
    Batch Size: 5 gallons (fermentor volume)
    Boil Size: 7 gallons
    Boil Gravity: 1.038
    Efficiency: 70% (brew house)


    STATS:
    Original Gravity: 1.053
    Final Gravity: 1.014
    ABV (standard): 5.1%
    IBU (tinseth): 23.79
    SRM (morey): 9.07

    FERMENTABLES:
    8 lb - American - Pale 2-Row (76.2%)
    1 lb - American - Munich - Light 10L (9.5%)
    1.5 lb - American - Caramel / Crystal 30L (14.3%)

    HOPS:
    0.25 oz - Columbus, Type: Pellet, AA: 15, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 17.46
    0.75 oz - Centennial, Type: Pellet, AA: 10, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 6.33
    0.5 oz - Centennial, Type: Pellet, AA: 10, Use: Dry Hop for 7 days
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Never had it so won't opine as to the accuracy. Nothing about it seems like a bad start. I might argue against over 14% crystal malt for this style, but maybe it's appropriate for that particular iteration. Something as simple as switching the amounts of Munich and Crystal will likely make it a cleaner-finishing beer.
    Here's a link to your recipe so others can get a better idea of what you're up to with it:
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/701418/red-racer-clone-still-in-the-works-
     
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  3. Steve21

    Steve21 Member

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    I haven't tried brewing it yet just wanting some input before hand which you have given. I had been curious about a pound and a half of the crystal being to much as well though. Wasnt sure how to get it darker with their grain bill, makes me wonder if they left something out.
     
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  4. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Those descriptions of malts used are not the whole story, I suspect. I've had beers from the NW that list essentially just Pale Ale Malt or something like that and they're deep golden amber. Nothing like a single malt of 2-row or Pale would do. Either there's some decocting going on or they're not bothering to give the whole grain bill ( very likely).
    I'd be looking at dropping the Crystal back a little, maybe trying some Dark Munich in it's place for some color and throwing in an ounce or two of Special Roast or a few ounces of Victory for that "toasted body with a touch of sweetness".
     
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  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    so this is my interpretation of what the add reads, it's got a sweet first taste which comes from the caravienne, use any pale ale but not 2 row there is a difference, the caramunich will help with the color and maltness and the late sugar and selection of yeast will dry the finish

    FERMENTABLES:
    7 lb - Belgian - Pale Ale (71.8%)
    1.5 lb - Belgian - CaraVienne (15.4%)
    0.75 lb - Belgian - CaraMunich (7.7%)
    0.5 lb - Cane Sugar - (late addition) (5.1%)

    YEAST:
    Mangrove Jack - New World Strong Ale M42
     
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  6. Steve21

    Steve21 Member

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    I don't think I've ever seen dark Munich at my home brew store but I'll look again. I might toy around with some of your suggestions.
    Wonder why they would leave out parts of their grain bill. I suppose people copying it but honestly what's the ratio of home brews to people who just go buy it, maybe if the tables were turned I'd do the same.
     
  7. Steve21

    Steve21 Member

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    Damn you guys are good lol. Guess I have a few small batches I'm going to need to whip up.
    I'll have to read up on the difference between 2 row and just pale, I dont believe the shop I buy from has that either. 150,000 people and 1 place to buy grain, kind of annoying.
     
  8. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I just think of it as a brief description rather than a full list. No reason for them to add the tiny percentage of acidulated malt they might use, for instance. I think it's more about showcasing the type of malt they use.
    The simple ingredients they list will make a perfectly wonderful beer and if you did nothing other than that, you'd be happy. Maybe the Munich they use is darker than 10 and it lends some toastiness. Otherwise, I think of Munich and Caravienne together as mostly sweet and aromatic with definite deep-grain malty notes.
    If I were assuming no other malt than they list, I'd do 75% 2-row/Pale, 20% Munich and 5% Caravienne and see how it turned out. It's a relatively low-IBU beer so getting just the right residual sweetness without any cloying notes would be important.
     
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