Raising Mash PH

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Texas Ale Works, Jan 10, 2020.

  1. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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  2. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    What is the actual pH? 5.24 isn't horribly low, but if you want to raise it, sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) in very small amounts is about the only way using salts. Picking lime will work, but not as effective. The good or bad thing about baking soda is the sodium, less than 50ppm can help bring out the malt flavor, too much and it's saline.

    If you can add hard water, that would be the least risky. Chalk is not very useful because it will not go into solution easily, most times it simply falls to the bottom of the kettle.

    I would let it ride, myself.
     
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  3. philjohnwilliams

    philjohnwilliams Well-Known Member

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    #3 philjohnwilliams, Jan 10, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2020
    Unless you can measure the pH I would say do nothing. A predicted pH is just that, a prediction, and unless you know your pH for certain you may wind up making a correction that does more harm than good. 5.24 shouldn't be a problem.
     
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  4. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    #4 BOB357, Jan 10, 2020
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2020
    I'm with @philjohnwilliams. Unless you're measuring pH or have a boat load of confidence in the water tool, just let it be.
     
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  5. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    The reason to adjust isn't really for mashing or fermentation, but drinking. Adjusting the pH up will change the taste of the roasted malts. Most people will taste them as smoother, or maybe more chocolately if the pH is a bit higher. Whether you want to do that will depend on your tastes and you can do it at packaging. I probably wouldn't do it at mashing unless I'd made the recipe a few times and was sure how it was going to turn out.
     
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  6. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    Thanks one and all....

    Seems it was much ado about nothing
     

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