Priming calculator - Amount being packaged is calculated including ....

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Brewer #110209, Dec 12, 2017.

  1. Brewer #110209

    Brewer #110209 New Member

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    Priming calculator - "Amount being packaged" is calculated including the deposit at the bottom of the fermenter or not?
    It's really just the amount of beer that goes in the bottles right?
    I might have over primed then...
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/beer-priming-calculator/
    Thanks :)
     
  2. Gorm

    Gorm New Member

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    I looked at your link. I use the same volume (19 liters) and I use approx. 150 grams. I think your priming will work out ok depending on what carbonation levels you are looking for. I certainly wouldn't worry about over-priming or bottle bombs at the ratio you are using.
     
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    "Amount being packaged" is what goes into bottles. If you didn't rack your beer off the trub (sediment) then you'd have to include that, but you should be racking into a bottling bucket to get nothing but clear beer onto the priming solution. Whatever bottling vessel you're using, take some time to calibrate and mark it - pints or half liters is good - so you know how much you're dealing with.
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    The "amount being packaged" is actually the amount being primed. If you don't rack to a bottling bucket, you have to estimate how much trub you have and deduct it from the total volume. You aren't priming trub. If you leave beer in the bucket, you have to prime it. Here's why: By priming, you're adding two to three gravity points of sugar to the beer. So even if you leave the beer behind, you have to prime it so that the volume you do package has the same gravity increase. Yooper, if you're reading this post, it might be worthwhile to change the term "amount being packaged" to the term "Volume of beer being primed." It's a little clearer.
     
  5. Brewer #110209

    Brewer #110209 New Member

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    Ok thanks to everybody, i was not sure but now i am, it totaly makes sense.
    Yes i use another bucket to bottle them, so i can see there was 16L in that bucket, the fermenter was about 22L with the krausen and everything at the bottom deposit. So it appears i used 150g for 2.6 in all my past 4 brews that were 16-17L.. 18L max.
    They didn't exploded, but one that i added fruit after fermentation have almost exploded because of the added sugars from fruits + the priming sugar.

    Now next thing i have to try is better water from grocery instead of my robinet tap water, i don't drink it because it's not good taste, but i heard for brewing it was ok... but i'm a bit sceptic now and i'll try better water for my next batch.

    Thanks a lot :)
     
  6. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn’t brew with water I wouldn’t drink.

    As far as fruit, you have to let it ferment out, as you saw. Don’t put it in right before packaging. Or, you could just prime with it!! Of course, you’d have to know the sugar content for that to work. Not really practical.
     
  7. Brewer #110209

    Brewer #110209 New Member

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    Noted!
     

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