picking the right yeast...2

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #334426, Oct 21, 2020.

  1. Brewer #334426

    Brewer #334426 New Member

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    Finally starting to brew by recipe instead of kits. Doing my first BIAB big red winter cream ale

    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/brewsession/361663

    and scaled up to a 5 gallon batch. got everything but the yeast. going to assume
    White Labs 080 Cream Ale Blend unless you think something else would be better for this. Which brings me to my next question. Is there a good resource for picking the right yeast for the right recipie?
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    The yeast manufacturer's websites are one of the best resources for this. Otherwise, I've seen tables in the Interwebs that provide "eqiuvalent" yeasts - google should help you find them if you look for "yeast substitution for brewing."
     
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  3. Brewer #334426

    Brewer #334426 New Member

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    Think the white labs cream ale yeast is fine for the big red winter cream ale?
     
  4. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Cream Ale is probably the most misunderstood and misinterpreted styles in the BJCP roster. It's essentially a lager brewed with an ale yeast or, sometimes, with a lager yeast but at slightly higher temperatures.
    I don't what makes your recipe "winter" or "red" but I suspect that the yeast won't matter in the end. Since a lot of homebrewers insist on making something that's sweeter or flavored in some way and calling it a Cream Ale, the yeast gets lost in the jumble. Any yeast that's relatively "clean" in flavor profile will do just fine.
    I've brewed a spot-on, to-style Cream Ale with S-23 dry lager yeast and my best version of that style uses a combination of S-23 and S-33 dry yeasts. The S-33, when allowed to fully attenuate at high temps will show some fruity, Belgian-ish qualities but when it's kept low and the lager yeast takes over, the profile stays clean and malty. The S-33 brings a really different mouthfeel and helps make what can be a "thin" beer a little fuller.
    Change the share settings on your recipe so we can see what you intend to do and you'll get more specific advise.
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I use it in my Kentucky Common. See picture at left....
     

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