New To Kegging and Getting All Foam!

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by LindyBrew, Feb 14, 2018.

  1. LindyBrew

    LindyBrew New Member

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    Ok so admittedly I have watched the youtube videos on kegging and i feel like i'm doing it right but i'm ending up with ALL foam and by the time it all calms down and i work out a glass it's basically slightly carbed. Anyone want to give me a kegging for dummies bullet point? I'm at a loss here.

    Here's my current steps:

    Kegs are in garage at about 40-50 degrees F.

    1. Fill keg
    2. Set pressure to about 3 bar and burp it a few times and let it sit for a week or week and a half.
    3. Bleed off pressure and set to about 3-5 psi to dispense.
    4. Watch as dispensing tube and glass fill with basically all foam.
     
  2. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    Copper King Red Ale.JPG http://www.mikesoltys.com/2012/09/17/determining-proper-hose-length-for-your-kegerator/
    This might help. Check out the chart and it may explain why you are getting the results that you are getting.
    Hope it helps.
    By the way there are LOTS of sites that tell you how to serve your keg. I use this because these lengths and pressures are figured by physical data not "what works for me". Good luck!
    And yess I get consistently great pours with this calculation.
     
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  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Foaming has a few causes...hoses too short, temp too high, carb level too high, serving pressure too high. If you're saying that the keg your serving from is as warm as 50 degrees, that can be an issue. An easy way to isolate the cause is to remove the CO2 connection and purge all pressure from the keg, let it sit for a few minutes, purge it again and hook up the CO2 with the regulator set to no pressure. Open the tap and increase pressure just until you're getting flow. Pour a few ounces and you'll probably see that once the beer in the hose clears out, there's little or no foam and the carb level in the beer is pretty undisturbed. If it's really fizzy, there may be too much CO2 in suspension. If it's pretty much as it should be, just up the pressure enough to pour without any foam. If it's pouring super slow but filling a glass without foaming, you may need longer hoses...that way you can up serving pressure on properly carbed beer and have it flow relatively fast.
    Proper carb level is a function of pressure and temp, so consult a calculator or chart to be sure that you're getting that part right to begin with.
     
  4. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    2nd head firsts advise been kegging just over a year or so and this chart is the go to!
     
  5. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    What does 3 bar mean?
     
  6. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    It's another way to measure pressure instead of psi. No idea on how it converts though
     
  7. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    If it means 100 psi, we may have found the issue!!
     
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  8. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Here’s what I do
    1) keg beer
    2) allow to chill
    3) attach 25-30 psi and gently rock keg for 3 minutes
    4) remove hose. (At this point if I could attach 8 psi I would. Height limitation.)
    5) when I have tap space, bleed excess pressure and put into serving position.
     
  9. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    So I looked it up. 3 bar is about 45 psi. A week and a half at that pressure is way too long. I think I recall hearing about 3 weeks at serving pressure will do the job to carbonate, no excess pressure needed. From there, you just gotta make adjustments based on when you’d like to be drinking it, if you want to speed up the process.
     
  10. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, if you've got it way over-carbed, you just have to let it sit at a relatively warm temp for a day or so and purge excess pressure as the CO2 comes out of suspension. Then you can cool it down, pressurize to the proper level for the temp and wait for it to equalize. You can do the whole process at serving temp, but it's quicker if you allow some of the CO2 to escape at the warmer temp.
     
  11. Group W

    Group W Well-Known Member

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    45 lbs for a week +... :eek:

    After kegging, purging and cooling, I force carb @ 30 lbs for about 24-36 hours. I find 48 hours is too much.

    Lindy, you will have it dialed in soon. Enjoy :)
     
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  12. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, that's a lot of pressure for too long I think. I do about 36# for 34 hrs or so and knock it down to 12# for a few days and it settles out to be very drinkable within a few days. Once satisfied with the carb, I drop it between 5-8# typically. When I feel like getting my drink on, I'll bump it up a hair for faster pours :D:p
     
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  13. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    yep it.must be jumping into the glass at 45si! good luck lindy youll get there you have to no one likes drinking a glass of foam.
     
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  14. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    I’ll have to admit mine was just like that for years, I just changed faucets and lines and the length of lines and now it’s just the opposite, I have to add carapils to get a head on any beer
     

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