New england IPA out of steam?

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Jhogan0101, Oct 13, 2019.

  1. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Your chart isn't very useful without a reference to the fermentation time. Is it 2 weeks?, 1 week? 4 days?. Also I see your gravity going back up...that's not an accurate reading unless you added sugar.
    Without a lot more information, there's no way to speculate as to the cause of the stuck fermentation. The usual suspects are temperature and early flocculation. Very high mash temps may contribute to the problem, as well.
     
  3. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    thanks, it was pitched on the 9th. I did not add anything to it since pitching
     
  4. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Yep, the fancy chart doesn't tell much by itself. Hitting expected OG doesn't tell the story of wort fermentability either. Useful information is what will get you useful help.
     
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Then it looks like it went for 4 days and slowed down. That's totally common. You may just not be there yet.
    Lay out all the pertinent information - mash temp, yeast strain, aeration method, etc and you'll get more useful advice.
    If it was me, I'd probably rouse the yeast just in case it's starting to settle too soon but without more info, I'd be reluctant to give any specific input.
     
  6. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    Thanks J A, i mashed at 152F, went with wyeast 1028, aerated with pure oxygen for 30 seconds.
     
  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    No reason it won't attenuate further. It went pretty fast for the first day or two and I suspect that it didn't like that temperature drop. Even a few degrees can have an impact. Though that yeast is listed at low-medium flocculation, you might do a rouse just for good measure. By the look of your chart, I expect that you're using a Tilt or something. Just to be sure, I'd get a hydrometer reading and see what's actually happening.
    No matter what hold a steady, relatively high temp for another several days and check it. I'm thinking it'll sort itself out. ;)
     
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  8. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    Will do, thanks for the advice, much appreciated
     
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  9. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    For tilts you'll sometimes see gravity increases as bubbles attach themself to the device. A gentle swirl of the fermenter often helps with that.
     
  10. Jhogan0101

    Jhogan0101 Member

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    I was wonder why it was so up and down sometimes. Thanks!
     
  11. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    #11 Mase, Oct 14, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
    A couple things I’ve noticed when using the Tilt hydrometer:

    - Dry Hopping will temporarily raise the gravity for approximately 1 day, then the chart quickly returns back to where it should have been had the dry hop never occurred

    - Hop/yeast Krausen accumulate on the hydrometer and will throw off the results.

    With this in mind, I agree with JA and always check for FG with a hydrometer. The Tilt is great for letting you know that fermentation is going along and is a great tool for when to dry hop as you can see primary fermentation starting to tail off. But if you dry hop, expect to use your hydrometer for the most accurate readings.

    The photo below shows how much accumulates on the Tilt and it will “lean over” with any accumulations. and the brew in this photo had no dry hop additions. The Tilt works based on how far off from vertical the unit floats in solution. The more vertical, the lower the gravity reading, and with accumulations of hops or other debris in the wort/beer, it gets thrown off and yields in accurate readings. If you zoom in on the attached photo, you can see how much Krausen stayed on top of the Tilt even after the Krausen settled.

    0F0536BE-96F2-4BB5-BEB6-D33396B2F3E9.jpeg
     
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  12. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Yep quite a bit settled on its cap and your thermowell interesting you taught me something new today Mase :).
     
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