Mash Consistency

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by CudjoeFlats, Oct 1, 2018.

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  1. CudjoeFlats

    CudjoeFlats New Member

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    I just finished brewing my first all grain. I added 4 gallons of strike water to 13 pounds of grain, as calculated. The grains were "wet" but appeared to absorb all of the water. Making it very difficult to mix. I am concerned that me false bottom is too large. Do you add water to grains or grains to water? Is a "thick" mash the ideal consistency? Thank you!
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty minimum at less than 1.25 quarts per pound. If you have a lot of dead space so that a couple of quarts are below the grain bed, you'd probably be losing mash efficiency. Ideally you'd have a t least a little liquid on top of the grain bed when it's fully mashed in.
    Calculate your dead space and figure on a mash thickness of at least 1.25 to 1.5 qts/lb and add your dead space volume. Then adding infusions and/or mash-out volume could put you at up to 2 quarts per pound, depending on your mash schedule.
    Adding water to the dry malt is harder. I like to add the malt to the strike water. Now I have a set-up that allows milling directly into the recirculating strike water in the tun and can stir it in as it mills. I can start with a very thick dough-in that way (.8 qts/lb or so) and get the beta glucan/protein rest done before adding more water to get up to conversion temperature.
     
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  3. CudjoeFlats

    CudjoeFlats New Member

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    Thank you. Very helpful.
     
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  4. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    That's thick.....really thick!
    As JA mentioned, somewhat thinner than that is better. Not only will your efficiency will be better, but the chances of a stuck sparge are greatly reduced.
     
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  5. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Yeah jesus, the lowest I generally go is 2.5L/KG and that's when I don't have room for more water cause I'm trying to make an Imperial Stout or something Otherwise it's 3L/kg for everything or no sparge.
     

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