Looking for a Recipe....

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Nosybear, Sep 20, 2017.

  1. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    A couple weekends ago I scored ten pounds of Swaen Pilsner and a pound of Black Swaen biscuit malt. Since then I've been wondering what to do with it! I'm not familiar with the malts at all so I was wondering:

    1. Has anyone brewed with the Swaen line of malts?
    2. What would be a good beer to make of the two?

    I was thinking of doing a session saison or a dunkelweizen - I realize those are rather far apart - Or maybe some kind of Frankenbrew. My idea there, crush the two, put them together in a single infusion at 152 degrees, hop to about 25 IBU with whatever I can find in the freezer and finish with some Styrian, Striselspalt or other European hops, ferment them with some kind of mild yeast, maybe cream ale or California Common and just see what I get.

    Thoughts from the Forum?
     
  2. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I honestly had not thought of putting biscuit malt into a Pilsner. Might be a plan, or I might go with Pale Ale.... Hmmm.
     
  4. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Knowing me I'd go a Pilsner to get a taste of that Swann pils malt then go from there.
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'd reconsider to a Helles but I already have quite the large stock of it. Since the malt was my winnings and the LHBS doesn't even stock it normally, I think I'll go in the direction of Pale Ale Frankenbrew. It won't be a repeatable recipe unless someone locally starts stocking it.
     
  6. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Biscuit is a nice specialty malt. Be careful of overdoing it because it can add some sweetness like a crystal malt will but the toasty flavor is a really nice addition to a lot of brews. I brew a lot of recipes that include mostly Pilsner, up to 15 percent Munich and 5-10 percent specialty malt (mostly Victory or Biscuit).
    The recipe that you've outlined sounds perfectly great to me. I'd be tempted to make it a Belgian IPA with some noble hops for bitterness and flavor and a sizeable flavor/aroma addition of American hops along the lines Simcoe/Citra/Mosaic. Then use a Belgian yeast that's not too heavy on the phenols - I've had great luck with T-58 dry yeast starting in the 60 degree range and ramping up.
    Or maybe just a solid American Pale or IPA with WLP-090 for clean flavor and good attenuation that lets the malt really shine...or that thing that Ozark posted ^^^^. That looks pretty perfect! :)
     
  8. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Here's what I came up with:

    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/542958/black-swan-pale-ale

    Local brewpub uses the English yeast in their IPA and it's one of the few IPAs I absolutely love. I'm picking up what you're putting down, JA, but I'm not ready to do a session Saison with this just yet. I'll give that one a bit more thought - I'd want a Saison Dupont but in about the 5.5-6.0% range. OMB - thanks for the suggestion - it's much like what I was aiming for.
     
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  9. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Yes to all that! ^^^
    I agree about the English yeast. My first really good IPA was made with S-04.
    Recipe looks pretty great...If you don't brew it, I'm going to! :p
    Might use Nottingham just because I've got it and don't have Windsor. I like things on the dry side, anyway. ;)
     
  10. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    Ive brewed a beer just like that but used C60 in its place it was good
     
  11. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'll be crushing the grain and making sure I have all the necessary hops tomorrow night at homebrew night. Dough-in should be Sunday afternoon around 1-ish. Since I've bought a "yeast for a year" card and already have my Altbier yeast, I may choose to get a liquid yeast instead of the dry 'Nottty.
     
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