Leftovers

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by jdwebb, Mar 31, 2017.

  1. jdwebb

    jdwebb Member

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    Need some though on this one. I am cleaning out my leftover bin, and came up with this recipe.
     
  2. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Looks like there's a permission error with the recipe. Try sharing it again or making it public?
     
  3. jdwebb

    jdwebb Member

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    Try that.
     
  4. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    That works.
    Well, I got nothing. :(
    The one time I tried a braggot, I dry hopped with hibiscus (too much for too long). The end result was barely drinkable.

    I see you're not using hibiscus, so you're already well ahead of me

    Fwiw, I don't think it'll have a "brown" taste, where too many ingredients just muddy things up
     
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    #5 J A, Mar 31, 2017
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2017
    Steeping Flaked Corn is a non-starter. It's got no diastatic power and there are no converted sugars or dextrins as there would be in Cara-Crystal malt.
    Add it to several pounds of base malt to convert it in a mash. Otherwise it's just soggy cornflakes that don't contribute anything to the fermentables.

    Also, the honey will ferment out and leave little, if any honey flavor, if that's what you're going for. And if you boil it all the volatile aroma molecules are dissipated. I've gotten some reasonable honey notes by adding it directly to the fermenter after initial fermentation calmed down.
     
  6. jdwebb

    jdwebb Member

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    Thanks for the info on the corn. I like corn flakes, but not warm. I'll leave them out. I always put the honey in after the boil, at around 100ºF. I want to preserve the aroma and flavor a bit. Not looking for any residual sugar, if I want to sweeten it, I'll add about 3/4 pound of lactose.
     
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  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Honey won't add any residual anywhere in the mix. It'll ferment out completely and tend to dry out the finish.
    What you'll have with the recipe you're showing (without the corn) will be thin and very boozy. The bourbon addition will boost your 8+ ABV to well over 9%. I'd steep a little dark Crystal for body and flavor.
     
  8. jdwebb

    jdwebb Member

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    I'll do that. Just trying to use up some stuff I have leftover. I don't mind boozy...LOL
     
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  9. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    It'll just take a while to mellow out but the oak chips will help. Toast the chips in the oven and it'll change everything - I've been wanting to play around with that technique.
    Likely to be a bit of a skull-cracker! ;)
     
  10. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Second this honey is hard to get in the final beer. Even as a secondary option you don't get much honey aroma carry through. it can dry your beer some. But as I've herd some other Brewers here say save some coin and use simple sugar if you want to lighten the body:)
     
  11. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Honey tends to come back in a little more after other aromas/flavors mellow out with age. It's still subtle and mostly a waste of money. Only way I've gotten reasonable honey notes was using some Honey malt in the grist and adding a fair amount of honey straight into the fermenter. It'll still get covered up by other flavors, though.
     
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  12. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I'll agree on the honey malt.
    Ive read you could back sweeten it with honey once fermentation is done. But you'd need another additive to make sure the yeast stop eating. Forget what that is now, since I've never tried it
     
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  13. jdwebb

    jdwebb Member

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    I did a Bourbon Barrel stout with wildflower honey that turned out amazing. The honey aroma is prevalent, but only after aging for months. It takes a while to get the bourbon and oak to come through also. I have a local beekeeper that provides me with the most amazing wildflower honey I ever had.
     
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  14. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Very lucky!!! I'd be finding ways to use it in brewing for sure if I had access to great honey. ;)
     
  15. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Yea like make some mead!:D
     
  16. jdwebb

    jdwebb Member

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    I got into mead making several years ago, Have been fortunate to have tasted mead from many prominent meaderies, and am just not a big fan of mead...until I had a taste of a mead sent to me by one of our co-hosts on our show, The Mead House. It was a braggot, and it was great! So, my goal is to produce good, home-brewed braggots. It's a category seldom talked about, yet provides an opportunity of exploration similar to the craft beer world.

    I have an orange braggot I did with orange blossom honey and the aroma is absolutely there. I used orange zest in the boil, and secondary, and it tastes awesome. Another one I did using lactose in the boil and vanilla beans in secondary gave it a cream soda-like taste with orange and tangerine flavors.

    Unexplored, wild combinations and possibilities gives this category of mead opportunities to brew some amazing braggots.
     
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