Lager Yeast for Conditioning?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Thurston Brewer, Oct 9, 2016.

  1. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

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    I've read that some use finings to clear the beer and remove yeast (particularly ale yeast) before bottling, then add lager yeast with the priming sugar to perform the carbing in bottle. Lager yeast is supposed to t work better because it all collects at the bottom.

    Do you guys ever do that, or do your bottles just go home with the yeast that brought them?
     
  2. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    You'll have enough yeast in your beer for conditioning. No need to add more, but many like to do so. The only way yeast can be completely removed from beer is by filtering, which is impractical for a homebrewer.
     
  3. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

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    Even ale yeast will drop out into a nice firm layer on bottom of bottle .

    Every strain is different though , 2565 Kolsch is an ale yeast that seems to like hanging around even after a week at near freezing , Nottingham seems to drop clear in a week after ferment finishes
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    I am a big fan of removing all yeast from my beer and at times its been a challenge, mostly the reason is from nasty beer gas which the source is the yeast so Ive thought up all kinds of ways to remove it but some ways Ive come up with actually hurts the beer flavor so in those case you just have to not eat sugar "at all" which is very hard to do today, its in everything but my go to yest removal process is gelatin "done properly" and cold conditioning with time, those three are my best and easiest way to remove yeast. unfortunately its a keg thing not really for bottling since you need the yeast to carbonate in a bottle, I prefer to remove it in the kegs then bottle, at that point its half way to a somewhat version of commercial beer. if you start filtering which i have, and you want to remove yeast you start removing flavor at the same time so in order to adjust the flavor you will need to change the recipe drastically just to filter the finished beer with no yeast. Ive accomplished this but in my opinion just for home brewing " its not worth the effort" just fart lol
     
  5. Thurston Brewer

    Thurston Brewer Active Member

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    Well, I plan to use gelatin finings 24 hours before bottling. If that removes the yeast, I'll have to add some. If not??

    I just don't want to assume there will be enough yeast for conditioning then end up with flat (and over-sweet) beer.
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    As my friend the Colorado State viticulturalist says, all it takes is one cell and some time. Even with fining, there's plenty of yeast in a lager to condition the beer, it might take a couple of days longer.
     

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