Lackluster Activity in Airlock

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Frankenbrewer, Nov 13, 2019.

  1. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    I brewed a small 2 gal OG 1.113, put in a big mouth bubbler used Imperial A24 yeast. I'm not seeing rigorous activity. Temp is 71F. Its day 3. See anything wrong here?
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    A gas leak somewhere? Airlock activity is a poor predictor of fermentation activity.
     
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  3. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    Everything is right. My concern is more about the yeast's ability to handle the OG
     
  4. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Their the 200billion cells ones?
    Maybe airation /viability issue
     
  5. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    In a high gravity beer you need to worry more about the yeasts ability to finish fermentation than to start it. Sugars are the yeasts friends. Alcohol is the enemy at a certain point.. Without an adequate pitch of healthy yeast into well aerated/oxygenated wort the yeast will be much more likely to get off to a slower start and peter out as the beer nears its alcohol tolerance.

    At day 3 it's likely too late to correct any problem the beer might have. Probably best to just let it go and see how it turns out. You may be worrying about nothing if, as you stated, "Everything is right".
     
  6. Frankenbrewer

    Frankenbrewer Well-Known Member

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    Just did a gravity check. It's down to 1.070. I expect the final to be 1.028. There's no foam. Would pitching more yeast help?
     
  7. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    #7 BOB357, Nov 14, 2019
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2019
    Going by what little information you've given, it appears that fermentation was slow to start and has since been less than vigorous. If your gravity reading is correct, the beer is right around 6% ABV at this point. Not a bad 3 days. I'd give it a good swirl, and recheck gravity in a few days before considering a repitch.

    The only way I'd pitch more yeast would be by making a 1/2 liter starter and pitching it at high Krausen. Then I'd cross my fingers and do some reading on the subject of brewing high gravity beers.
     
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  8. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    Extract or all grain? If all grain, did the mash go ok? I'm with Bob on the swirl and give it a few days. Imperial says 10% on the ABV tolerance for that strain.

    Next steps would be hard for that small a batch as I'd try forcing a small sample with an overpitch of the original yeast to prove that there's fermentables left. If there's a chance the mash didn't work as well as hoped you could always try a relatively neutral diastaticus like WLP099. And remember to pay special attention to killing it when you're cleaning.
     
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