Irish Stout

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by JKrags, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    I agree 100% that Eldorado is a very poor choice for an Irish Stout. While Magnum is pretty neutral and should be fine for a bittering addition, 1 oz. at the levels of AA I have seen in the last couple of years (~ 12%) is too much for the style. You shouldn't get astringency from the steeping grains because you hit 170 unless the pH was too high. Also, you actually should really use distilled or RO water for extract brewing. The necessary minerals were added to the mash used to produce the extract.

    I would expect some age to mellow it out. If it doesn't mellow enough for your taste you might try stirring a pinch of calcium chloride in a pint.
     
  2. Kane Brews

    Kane Brews New Member

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    Hi Bob. A couple guys mentioned the steeping, if anything we had it on the low side 150-160 degrees for about 25 min. It was the first time we steeped without the flame on (on some advise), and it stayed pretty much on temp target. Never got near 170. One thing of note... pulled the grain bag up let it drip for a min (didn't squeeze) and put it in a sanitized Pyrex pitcher. After a few minutes I did pour some of the liquid from the bottom into the boil pot. Maybe a half cup.

    I'm really thinking about this PH thing. What is RO water?

    I looked up North East Poland Springs water profile on this site and PH from 2016 is 7.33. Brewers Best says not good above 6 and 5.2 is optimal! I found my local water report, that is worse 7.55 PH. Here is my local water report below. It's not any better. How do we adjust for PH? Thanks.


    IMG_0134 copy.jpg
     
  3. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    RO is reverse osmosis. Many of the super market chains have dispensers where you can fill jugs for around 40 cents/gallon. It's right next to being distilled if the dispenser is serviced regularly. I saw where you kept your steeping temperature in check. Just clearing up a misstatement from Brewers Best about astringency. With the reported alkalinity, the dark malt should have dropped the pH to an acceptable level for your steep
    .
    Before adjusting the pH, you need to know more about the water. That's why many of us use RO water and build from there. With extract, like I said, Distilled or RO, which is much less expensive, if available locally.

    From what you typed in this post I believe your harshness is coming from the hops and not your process.

    As was stated in other responses, now you have a resource to put together your own recipes and/or enter the contents of a kit and see what to expect.

    Happy Brewing,
     
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  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Water pH really doesn't matter. After that, it gets complicated: What matters is the mash pH. And more than that really doesn't belong in a beginner's forum.
     
  5. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Amen to that!
     
  6. Kane Brews

    Kane Brews New Member

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    Hi all & Vthokiedsp too - always very careful about the steeping temp! didn't make that mistake! AND, I'm not bashing kits, but we are done with that -six weeks later and what a six weeks its been! Created a recipes here and brewed a really good APA, just bottled a Wit (Allagash clone) which (cross fingers) actually tastes like a Wit! :) AND, just for S & S made 1.5 gallons of Stout, which I just put into a secondary because we are going to cold crash and try our hand at force carbonating into our new baby keg for St Pattys. Tasted it and what a difference!! Recipe below. Thanks for all your input and help!

    HOME BREW RECIPE:
    Title: Dry Irish Stout - 1.5 gallon
    Author: KK

    Brew Method: Extract
    Style Name: Dry Stout
    Boil Time: 60 min
    Batch Size: 1.5 gallons (fermentor volume)
    Boil Size: 2 gallons
    Boil Gravity: 1.024
    Efficiency: 35% (steeping grains only)

    STATS:
    Original Gravity: 1.044
    Final Gravity: 1.011
    ABV (standard): 4.29%
    IBU (tinseth): 34.08
    SRM (morey): 37.62

    FERMENTABLES:
    1 lb - Dry Malt Extract - Light (50%)
    0.4 lb - Dry Malt Extract - Light - (late addition) (20%)

    STEEPING GRAINS:
    0.25 lb - United Kingdom - Roasted Barley (12.5%)
    0.25 lb - American - Caramel / Crystal 90L (12.5%)
    0.1 lb - American - Carapils (Dextrine Malt) (5%)

    HOPS:
    0.35 oz - East Kent Goldings, Type: Pellet, AA: 6.1, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 34.08

    OTHER INGREDIENTS:
    0.3 tsp - Irish moss, Time: 15 min, Type: Fining, Use: Boil

    YEAST:
    Fermentis / Safale - English Ale Yeast S-04
    Starter: No
    Form: Dry
    Attenuation (avg): 75%
    Flocculation: High
    Optimum Temp: 54 - 77 F
    Fermentation Temp: 70 F
    Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)
     
  7. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Looks interesting. I hope it turns out.
     

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