I Got an Infection...I think....What do you think?

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by JohnAdam, Jan 19, 2017.

  1. JohnAdam

    JohnAdam New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2016
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    #1 JohnAdam, Jan 19, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2017
    I so brewed some Graff late September and life and kids got in the way, so I haven't had a chance to bottle it until recently. Its been sitting on the yeast cake for almost three months (whoops).

    There is something in my carboy that I've never seen before and I'm not sure if its an infection or some yeast byproduct. Nothing inside appears fuzzy.

    Its been looking like this for a month with no change. Temperatures in my house fluctuate but the beer has been in storage between 64 and 72 degrees.

    Here are some pictures. When I took the airlock off I took a whiff.....nothing out of the ordinary with my quick sniff. Smelt like cider.

    [​IMG]

    Tags: descargar tonos, iphone ringtones, sonidos para celular, funny ringtones free
     
  2. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,425
    Likes Received:
    9,482
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Give her a taste mate give her a taste:p.
     
  3. Myndflyte

    Myndflyte Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2016
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    59
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Nothing in there will kill you so tasting it is the best way to know for sure. If it takes fine, bottle it up.
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    looks like a sour to me, without even trying lol
     
  5. newmanwell

    newmanwell Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    Take a sample and let your nose and tongue figure out if it's infected.
     
    jeffpn likes this.
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,378
    Likes Received:
    6,608
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    If it smelled like cider, it's infected. Acetobacter. Two things going on: First the infection, second, the presence of oxygen. Acetobacter can't grow without O2. As mentioned, taste it. Might be decent as a Sour. Work on your sanitation and keep oxygen - air - away from the beer to keep this from recurring.
     
  7. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    I agree with the oxygen, I never open my fermenter anymore, "ever" ,if I open it up its time to transfer
     
    Trialben likes this.
  8. Wood House Hall

    Wood House Hall Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2016
    Messages:
    106
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Self employed
    #8 Wood House Hall, Jan 23, 2017
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2017
    Ozark, how do you test SG? I open a few times but I always sanitize EVERYTHING (stopper, airlock, etc.) each time.

    I'll be putting a sample port on the Fast Fermenter so I shouldn't have to open that one anymore to sample and test SG.
     
  9. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,425
    Likes Received:
    9,482
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    I'm sure it's the blanket of co2 that sits atop of the beer whilst sitting and waiting for transfer to bottles or keg. By opening fermentor you may disperse this co2 blanket and introduce oxygen back into fermentation vessel increasing risk of contamination and oxidation of beer.
     
  10. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    I know my system very well, I also have digital displays reading the wort and the air, when the two temps are the same for 24 hours its done
     
    jeffpn and Wood House Hall like this.
  11. Wood House Hall

    Wood House Hall Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2016
    Messages:
    106
    Likes Received:
    54
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Self employed
    Fair enough. Because science. :)
     
  12. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,378
    Likes Received:
    6,608
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Cue Thomas Dolby.... I check gravities in two ways, depending on the fermentor in use. Checking gravity with a "thief" doesn't scare me much - the fermenting/fermented beer has a CO2 blanket atop it, the thief doesn't create too much turbulence or displace too much of the gas so I don't worry there. Some of my fermentors are ported - I take the sample from the bottom. Yes, a little air gets sucked in but that's not enough to worry about. Any time I rack, I flush the new container with CO2 so any splashing won't cause oxidation. And that's made quite a positive contribution to my beer quality as well!
     
    Wood House Hall and J A like this.
  13. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    2,688
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    I dumped a small batch of a really nice English bitter that had a nice layer of skunge on it. I wish I'd had more options, but we were moving shortly after and I didn't want to set up a fermenter for souring. And, I was bottling that batch so that the extra organisms would surely have over-carbed the beer and caused bottle bombs eventually.
     
  14. Classic LL

    Classic LL New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2017
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    If you can spare the equipment, I'd say that you leave it until whatever it's doing dies down (might be a few months), and see what you end up with! Along time ago, I pitched a similar batch that was transforming into something else, and I've kind of regretted it since. Worst case, you end up with something gross and you can toss it. Best case, you end up with a really, really dry drink which sounds kinda delicious to me. Maybe rack it off the yeast to age, though?
     
  15. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    2,688
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    ^^^^^ 2X that

    I've got an incredible little sour going right now that happened when I let some wort sit out overnight. I've been cultivating it and I'm getting ready to brew a Saison and add it to the mix. I tried a little of it the other day and it's heavenly! Tart and very fruityb with no hint of harsh medicinal tang you can get from some of those "infections". :)
     
    Trialben likes this.
  16. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,425
    Likes Received:
    9,482
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    I'm thinking lactobacillus most likely with that tart you describe.
     
    J A likes this.
  17. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    2,688
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    Yeah...lacto is present in the grain and I left some un-boiled wort out where the spent grain was draining. It wasn't outside so it's not wild yeasts. It's good, whatever it is. ;)
     
  18. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,425
    Likes Received:
    9,482
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    You'll be able to keep it and culture it up for your next mystery sour:D
     
    J A likes this.
  19. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,378
    Likes Received:
    6,608
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    I've caught a sourdough starter on my kitchen counter. There are definitely wild yeasts indoors! I don't think the un-boiled wort is the issue, it's just some random bug.
     
  20. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2016
    Messages:
    3,474
    Likes Received:
    2,688
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Austin, Texas
    That's true, for sure. In this case the wort was draining into a pot with the colander completely covering the top. I didn't remove the grain and clean up that pot for a couple of days (I know...sloppy brewing technique that I can only get away with when the weather is cool). It was completely and exposed to the grain. Could be a wild yeast, but I'll take it. :)
     

Share This Page

arrow_white