how long mashed a dark Czech lager

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #340326, Nov 19, 2020 at 10:34 PM.

  1. Brewer #340326

    Brewer #340326 New Member

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    Hi
    I am trying to brew a dark czech lager but the recipe does not said how long and at what temperature I shout mash
    any help ?
    Thanks for your help
    happy brewing
    all the best
    Vince
     
  2. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I'd go 64C for 60 minutes. For a simple answer.
     
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    "Recipes" are based on the specific system of the brewer who came up with the beer. Adjustments must be made to accommodate your particular system, including water volumes, efficiency, mash temps and times. You need to know your own equipment and brewing method well enough to be able to "fill in the blanks" for recipes that don't have all the information. Many lagers use a step-mash schedule but the single-infusion suggested above will do the job, depending on the malt.
     
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  4. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Yeah it's not a perfect solution but without details it will give you something workable. It's what I use with just regular 2-row lagers.
     
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  5. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    You are new here!
    There is a section of this forum called Introductions, maybe post there, say hello, and tell us a little about your brewing career.
     
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  6. hundel

    hundel Member

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    #6 hundel, Nov 20, 2020 at 7:30 PM
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2020 at 7:37 PM
    The established best practice for conversion in a lager mash using Pilsner malt is 90 minutes. Opinions differ regarding how well-modified modern Pilsner malt responds to a shortened 60 minute mash. You can get great lager with a simple 90 minute mash at 152F.

    Most experienced brewers perform Pilsner mashes in steps, with 2 or 3 rests, each at a progressively higher temperature. Traditional Pilsner mashes involve one or more decoctions (easily performed if you brew ina bag by removing a portion of the mash, boiling it, and returning it) and this technique is one way to create the “step” mash temperatures. Step mash temps can also be achieved through the burner if you have a heavy bottom to your boil kettle, but some stirring is advised to prevent burning. Nowadays, with dry beers being favored, many people feel decoction adds too much sweet grain flavors, which the piilsner malt already has enough of on its own, as it darkens and concentrates the sugars in the wort.

    If you are new to lager, and want to keep it simple, then 90 minutes at 152F or the Hochkurz method (45 min at 144F, 45 min at 160F, 170F mash out/sparge) are both reasonable options.
     
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  7. BarbarianBrewer

    BarbarianBrewer Well-Known Member

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    While I agree with what JA and Hundel said, I think one of the primary rules for a new brewer should be to keep it simple. That, and having patience. Once you get your process down, then you can start using more complicated processes such as step mashes and decoction. Homebrewing can be as simple/complicated, as cheap/expensive, as fun/tortuous as you want it to be.

    However, to answer your question: A 60-90 minute mash is pretty much standard. If you search the forums you will see discussions on 20 minute mashes as well as overnight mashes. So there is a very wide variance on mash duration. It's the temperature and mash PH are more important. Again, in the beginning, don't stress too much about being spot on for either. Get as close as you can and work on getting closer in future brews. One tool that is very useful is a mash calculator. I use the one here in the Brewer's Friend recipe calculator.

    upload_2020-11-20_16-28-50.png
     
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  8. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I was aiming to not overwhelm him.
     

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