Honey Wheat Beer

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Timmer22, Apr 24, 2017.

  1. Timmer22

    Timmer22 New Member

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    Light summer beer recipe let me know if this will work out. Thanks

    3lbs Pale Malt 2 Row
    2lbs Flaked Corn
    2lbs 4 ounces 6 Row
    .5 pound Honey Malt
    Cascade Hops .5 at 60 min
    Cascade Hops .5 at flame out
    Cascade Hops 1 ounce dry hop for 14 days
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Looks like a nice beer but there's no wheat in your "Honey Wheat Beer". o_O ;)
    You don't mention anything about batch size, OG/FG. IBU's. yeast strain, etc. The grain bill and hop schedule you lay out looks quite good and is the beginning of a good recipe but without knowing how you intend to process it, there's not much way to give you any real feedback on it. Plug it into the calculator and save and share the recipe with a link. Then there'll be enough info to get a discussion going. :)
     
  3. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    other than what JA said, is there a reason you've got 2 and 6 row? maybe you meant for one to be wheat malt?
     
  4. Timmer22

    Timmer22 New Member

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    Yeh you're right no wheat. I'll change the name. And yeh I want to use 2 row and 6 row. I'll post up the recipe after I reek again think I'm going to go to 1 lbs of honey malt too. And using 05 yeast. Btw
     
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  5. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Could call it honey cream ale ??
     
  6. Timmer22

    Timmer22 New Member

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    Ok my brewing friends here is a pic of my beer smith recipe build. I changed it to Honey Orange Crisp,
     

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  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    You have a pretty good amount of corn so your 6-row isn't a bad idea. You need extra diastatic power in the malt to convert the corn. but I think most modern 2-row will handle the job on as much as 25 percent. I don't like going over 20% adjunct myself but it should work.
    I really, really doubt that you want even a pound of Honey Malt and definitely not 2. It's going to get some sweetness from the corn and the a little Honey Malt goes a long way. If anything, knock it down to .25 lb.
    Brew it as you have it and it's either a Blonde Ale or a Cream Ale. I'd skip the dry hopping and call it a Honey Cream.In fact, If you're determined to add orange, drop a little vanilla extract into the secondary and give it slightly Dreamsicle flavor.
    Mash at 150 or so to get lots of fermentable - the Honey Malt is going to give you sweetness and body. Should be quite good.
     
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  8. Timmer22

    Timmer22 New Member

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    Will do JA on the honey Malt. What's your thoughts on adding the orange? I was going to do one with and one without
     
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  9. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I'd do just that
     
  10. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I'd save the orange for a Wheat beer and use it in conjunction with a different yeast, but it'll make a nice beer. It's good you're doing it both ways. I might push the IBUs a little higher so there's a bit of a balance to the fruit notes.
    I think you'll come up with something very drinkable and refreshing if you can get a low attenuation and crisp finish.
     
  11. Timmer22

    Timmer22 New Member

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    What ibu's you recommend for this. My wife loves a less hoppy beer, but I know I can push it a little bit higher for her, Add more cascade at the boil?
     
  12. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Nobody is likely to think that anything up to 20 IBUs of Cascade is too hoppy. And extra hops at flame-out will probably do just about as much good as your dry-hop (14 days is too long, btw), especially if you leave it in for the entire cool-down.
    Here's what I'd do with it:
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/484246/honey-orange
    And when you want to change it up just exchange your 6-row for White Wheat and trade your Cascade for noble hops.

    You'll know by the time you've had a few glasses of whether you like the amount of orange. A little goes a long way for me but just the right touch of it is really nice.
     
  13. Timmer22

    Timmer22 New Member

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    I messed up on my honey Malt. I only wanted 1 lb. I'm going to do your recipe now - that's why I like this forum and the distillers forum the same everyone's helpful.
     
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  14. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I don't know how much your 6 row will bring to it but it'll be interesting to try it. I think you'll like it better if you ever try a batch where you sub the 6-row with wheat.
    Good luck with it!
     
  15. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Did a batch recently using only six-row as the base grain. Lots of adjuncts (corn, rye and some molasses) but it came out crystal-clear and yummy - the graininess of the six-row works well in some beers.
     
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  16. Timmer22

    Timmer22 New Member

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    Red or White?
     
  17. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I always use White Wheat. Never tried Red Wheat. No reason not to experiment with it, though. Not sure but I think you might get more characteristic wheat flavor and body from White Wheat.
     
  18. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Not much difference, really. I've used both. I doubt anyone could tell the difference side-by-side.
     
  19. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure I should say I think you'll like it better, but the basic ingredients that you're putting together will make a really good American Wheat. Wheat and flaked corn isn't something you see in the same beer much, but nothing to lose by trying. :)
     
  20. KC

    KC Active Member

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    I prefer the flavor of red for most weizens and belgians. White is distinctly bready which doesn't fit all wheat beers. It's awesome with Victory, though. Smells like cookies.
     
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