Fermentation Temperature / D-Rest of Amber Ale

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by John Quiroga, Feb 6, 2018.

  1. Rat Terrier

    Rat Terrier New Member

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    I have been reading John Palmer’s How To Brew and I am currently fermenting an amber ale. With that being said I plan to follow his recommended maturation rest guidelines for ales.

    I am currently fermenting at 67F and plan to raise it to 72F within the next 2 days. The guideline recommends to leave it for a minimum of 4 days and up to a max of 8 days.

    After the 8th day do I plan to leave it for another week. After the 8th day what do I lower the temperature too?
     
  2. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Temperature info isn't much use without knowing yeast strain. And is 67 your wort temp or air temp? How long has it been fermenting?
    Most ale strains don't need a D-rest, though some English strains can benefit. Diacetyl won't crop up with most yeasts, even some lager strains, at 67 degrees, so you may not need to do anything. Some yeasts like a temp raise in order to avoid dropping out and stalling. Personally, I'd leave it at 67 for the duration, depending on yeast strain, but 72 is a good temp so if you decide to raise it, might as well leave it until it's time to cold-crash.
     
  3. Rat Terrier

    Rat Terrier New Member

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    My yeast strain is Safale US-05 Ale. The 67 is wort temperature, I have a probe taped to the side with some insulation. It has been fermenting since Saturday Feb 3rd.

    I may follow the advice of raising it to 72 nd holding till I cold crash. I wasn’t planning on cold crashing till about a good 3 weeks. So I was planning feb 24.
     
  4. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    You won't hurt a thing either way. US-05 produces little to no diacetyl at typical ale temps, but 72 is a very comfortable temp for it, especially after several days of 67F.
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    No need to lower the temperature at all for an ale!
     
  6. Rat Terrier

    Rat Terrier New Member

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    What do you mean? I plan on raising the temperature.
     
  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    You asked what temperature to lower the beer to after 8 days, right?
     
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  8. Rat Terrier

    Rat Terrier New Member

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    Oh. Now I’m tracking. When I move to the secondary fermenter and set the temperature at 72 F will it affect the beer if I leave it at that temp for 2 weeks?
     
  9. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Nope. Once it's fermented, it's pretty stable unless you slosh it around and dissolve air or your sanitation failed somewhere.
     
  10. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

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    Don’t sweat the temperature on an ale. Don’t sweat it on a lager either, really, once it’s packaged. Think of a canned lager you might buy. It’s cold lagered, cold filtered, cold packaged, cold shipped, and cold stored until you buy it. Then you put it in your warm car and take it home where it sits warm next to the refrigerator until your previous case of beer is gone. Then you chill it and drink it, and it’s probably not very much unlike it would’ve been if it was cold the entire time.

    That said, try to keep your beer below 90°. :p
     

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