Do your different hop varieties ripen at differing times?

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by Lil guy, Aug 2, 2018.

  1. Lil guy

    Lil guy Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2018
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Disabled
    Location:
    Illinois
    I noticed that my Centennial bines are ripening at a more rapid pace than my Cascade. For that matter, my Magnum bines barely have indications of cone development yet. There are subtle differences in the light each bine gets, so I can only assume that is the variable that creates the inconsistency if the varieties don't mature at a differing rate. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Messages:
    3,751
    Likes Received:
    7,311
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    Yes they do. And different hop plants of the same variety can also.
     
    Lil guy likes this.
  3. Lil guy

    Lil guy Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2018
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Disabled
    Location:
    Illinois
    I have them strung up to the eves of my garage for the first year on the south side for full sun. They have been evenly irrigated, and the soil is very consistent. The differences in light is from the reflection of light off the garage siding, as it is white siding. The Centennial rhizomes were considerably bigger than the rest of the 5 varieties, but the Centennial in the center with the highest amount of reflected light grew to a higher elevation, over 14 feet this 1st year. The varieties in the center of the wall with the highest amount of reflected light grew and are maturing faster than those toward the lower ends of the gable. The ends have less siding to reflect light. I could only account the light variable from having no experience with growing hop bines. Thanks for the response Thunderwagn I might just climb the ladder and pick them as they mature since it is only the first year. Next year, they should be much much better if this year is any measure.
     
  4. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Messages:
    3,751
    Likes Received:
    7,311
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    That's what I would do. Pick what's ripe and let them continue to grow a good root system and establish as long as possible. Cut them down this fall. Next year you can just start taking down by bines. That's what I'd do anyway. You'll get to a point where having some smaller hop loss won't mean so much. Sounds like you're having a great 1st year! That's awesome.
     
    Lil guy likes this.
  5. Lil guy

    Lil guy Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2018
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Disabled
    Location:
    Illinois
    I understood them to only get 8-10 feet the first year.
     
  6. Yooper

    Yooper Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2013
    Messages:
    2,494
    Likes Received:
    1,584
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Happily retired
    Location:
    Upper Michigan/Florida
    Oh, no, mine easily got much bigger the first year- full size in height but less cones than in future years. Now, they are just a huge jungle and out of control and popping up all over the yard- they are quite invasive.
     
    Lil guy likes this.
  7. Lil guy

    Lil guy Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2018
    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    25
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Disabled
    Location:
    Illinois
    I read that it is recommended to divide the rhizome every few years like perennial plants that seed. The rhizome just continues to grow like any other rhizome plant. Kentucky Blue grass used to be the Cadillac of grasses for its ability to be dense as it is a rhizome grass.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white