Distilling mash and Flaked Corn

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Texas Ale Works, Jul 13, 2020.

  1. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    I need to set up a mash for distilling, I BIAB and was wondering how much flaked corn I can push it too without issues?
    Also wondered if I start the basic 2 row, then add the corn wold that help as there will be enzymes ready to convert the corn and maybe it will ot get a gummy?

    Looking at 15 pounds of basic pale malt and as much corn as I can get away with

    T
     
  2. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    You need somewhere around an average of 30 in diastatic power for starch conversion. The pale ale malt should be around 100 or so, but if you have the data, you can get a better calc. Corn has a diastatic of 0. So, you should be able to mash somewhere in the neighborhood of 3 lbs corn per pound of malt.
     
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  3. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    that I understand, but corn gets gummy and sticky......how much corn before i foul the mash up in the bag

    that is the question!

    T
     
  4. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    Good question. I have never used that much corn (since I'm not a moonshiner!), but I think that adding rice hulls might help. A lot of brewers use these when they have a high percentage of flaked oats to help with the gumming.
     
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  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    You'll definitely need rice hulls and to cereal mash that corn (unless you're using flakes). I believe the ratio for whiskey is 25% barley to 70% maize. The rice hulls will loosen the mash.
     
  6. Group W

    Group W Well-Known Member

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    Best source of information on this subject is homedistiller.org
     
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  7. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I've done up to 20 percent of flaked corn or rice without rice hulls without any trouble. Cooked rice or corn is a different story. My understanding is that up to 30% adjunct will convert with most base malt. If you're concerned about conversion, malted wheat has about the highest diastatic power and should be the best at converting adjunct.
     
  8. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    using flaked corn....should have said that to start with...sorry
     
  9. ^Tony^

    ^Tony^ Active Member

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    I BIAB and have made a cream ale with 20% flaked corn. I did not do a cereal mash nor did I use rice hulls and it turned out well. The caveat is I had trouble with the mash conversion (I don't think I had near enough diastatic power to convert all the corn) so I will need to adjust the recipe for that. As Bubba sugests, you may want to consider that as well, especially if you are going above 20% adjuncts.

    As I understand it, the rice hulls are more if you are using a "traditional" mash tun not BIAB. The rice hull help prevent the gooy mess that plugs the holes in manifold at the bottom of the tun and gives you a stuck mash. As long as you can mix the grains and adjuncts while you add them to the bag you may not need to bother with the rice hulls because there is no manifold to plug. That said, rice hulls are pretty cheap and won't hurt the beer.
     
  10. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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  11. ^Tony^

    ^Tony^ Active Member

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  12. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    An uncle told me he heard from his brothers stepfather...in law... to shoot for a starting gravity 1.070-1-080. Don't use turbo yeast. Use bakers/bread yeast. Ferment to or below .99
     
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  13. Texas Ale Works

    Texas Ale Works Active Member

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    yep.....indeed.....of course..
    will add sugar to get it the rest of the way
     
  14. Group W

    Group W Well-Known Member

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    #14 Group W, Jul 18, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2020
    I saw on tv that you can ferment on the grain. No stuck sparge, heck, no sparge. Just get a big old pot BOP.:)
     

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