Curious.....

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Elayne, Mar 29, 2019.

  1. Elayne

    Elayne New Member

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    Hello everyone:

    I am not a beer maker but a wine maker & would like more info of the Alcohol by Volume
    Calculator...how can I convert this for figuring the alcohol content in wine? Is there one designed
    strickly for wine?

    I have a small farm up on the top of the South Mountain here in Nova Scotia, Canada and am a grape grower
    and wine maker.

    It is great is read the various comments...many concerns are the same as what we have in wine making.
     
    Brewer #225978 likes this.
  2. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    #2 Mase, Mar 29, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2019
    If you use the calculator that I think you are referring to in this site (https://www.brewersfriend.com/abv-calculator/), you can simply plug in the Original Gravity and the Final Gravity readings and the calculator will yield the ABV. I’m not sure of the science behind all this on whether the calories and attenuation are correct or not, but the ABV should be the same whether you are calculating for beer or wine. (If other disagree... they can/will chime in). Great group of knowledgeable folks here.

    Gravity is the weight of the liquid compared to water. Water (distilled) will weigh in at a Specific Gravity of 1.000. Gravity samples taken for brewing or winemaking measure the amount of sugar in the water. So a gravity reading of 1.050 tells you how much sugar is present when the reading is taken.

    So when you first make beer or wine, right before you add the yeast, you take a gravity sample. Then when fermentation is complete, you take another gravity sample/reading. The difference between the 2 is calculated to be the ABV.

    Did you take an Original and Final Gravity? If you didn’t take the Original Gravity, you’ll have to make an educated guess based on your ingredients.
     
    Trialben likes this.
  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Use the alternate formula - it's closer for higher gravity products like wine. And as Mase said, take the gravity before you add (pitch) yeast, that's the original gravity, or OG. I believe you can switch the calculator over to Brix if you want to measure in that unit or just use a beer hydrometer/refractometer and record the gravity. Take the gravity again once the wine has fermented, that's your final gravity. Then plug the numbers into the calculator, make sure the "alternate" method is selected and it will tell you your estimated ABV.
     
  4. Brewer #225978

    Brewer #225978 New Member

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    Do you have its shop?
    Well, I like red wine.:)
     
  5. Mia Parsons

    Mia Parsons Guest

    Red wine is my weakness too :)
     
  6. Ward Chillington

    Ward Chillington Well-Known Member

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    Yooper's Welches recipe! Love it!
     

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