Bouncer Beer filter

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by dave althouse, Feb 23, 2018.

  1. dave althouse

    dave althouse Member

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    I don't know that is why I ask! I recently saw a add for the "Bouncer" beer filter, claiming to filter trub, yeast and other stuff to make beer cloudy. I bottle and I also assume that I need a bit of yeast to carbonate my brew. If this is the case, I don't know, will it filter out to much yeast and I get low/no carbonation, or has the yeast dissolved and will pass through the filter.

    thanks

    dave a
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    It won't filter yeast. Yeast is far too small. I've looked at the thing a time or two and mostly end up not getting it because what it filters won't hurt your beer. Keep the hop debris out of the fermentor and don't worry about the trub. And by the way, none of that (with exception of a hefeweizen yeast) will keep beer from becoming or staying cloudy.
     
  3. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    The Bouncer filter looks like it’s a pretty course filter, more like a strainer than a filter. There’s no way it could remove yeast. Chunks of trub and hop debris are strained out, but smaller hop debris would make it through. I’d guess that’s a 50-100 micron screen at best. Yeast is between 5-8 micron in size depending on strain and type. Even with a 1 micron cartridge filter, yeast gets by the filter. It seems to go around the ends of filter.

    I gave up filtering a couple of years ago. It’s a PITA. There’s always the risk of O2 ingress when filtering. Like NB said, trub and hops don’t affect clarity in the finished beer. Suspended yeast, tannins and excess proteins are the root cause of haze. Cold crashing and clarifiers are the most effective means of clearing beer. As long as you don’t lager for 4 weeks, there’s plenty of yeast for bottle conditioning.
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    I'd add to that, a good mash and vigorous boil are the best places to start to get clarity. The more protein and tannin you can get out of your beer the better, at least for clarity. And no, before we go there, the trub won't provide haze proteins, in fact, I've seen some evidence that beers with trub in the fermentor actually come out clearer than "clean" worts.
     
    thunderwagn and J A like this.
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    ^^^ 2X that...I boil hard and almost always for 90 minutes, chill and transfer everything to the fermenter. When the break material drops, the wort is crystal clear. Once fermentation stops, the break material settles back to the bottom quickly and once the yeast has dropped out, the finished beer is just as clear.
    I've never filtered and I wouldn't do so post-fermentation for fear of oxidation.
     
  6. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I use gelatin and have never tried filtering, seems like a lot of work to me.
     

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