Bottling in three days, but still fermenting??

Discussion in 'Beginners Brewing Forum' started by Brewer #321532, Jun 3, 2020.

  1. Jonny the Brewer

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    Hi everyone I am new to brewing and have a few questions.

    This Saturday will be two weeks since I brewed and my 1 gallon demi jon is still bubbling every 20 seconds or so. Today is Wednesday so I only have three days until I bottle on Saturday. If it's still bubbling every 20-30 seconds do you think I should delay bottling by a few days?

    Any help greatly appreciated. Thanks!

    Jonny
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    If it's still bubbling at all, don't bottle. I'd give you the standard advice about no change in gravity readings in three days but with a gallon batch, you don't want to lose that much beer. When it stops bubbling, give it a week, then bottle. That should be safe.
     
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Rising temperature (even a few degrees) can release enough CO2 to make it bubble. The condition and appearance of your beer will tell you more. If it's still very cloudy, the yeast may still be active. if it's relatively clear and the yeast is thick on the bottom, it's probably not fermenting at all.
    That being said, the only way you can be certain is with hydrometer readings over 2-3 days. When the reading is fairly low and is the same over 2-3 days, it's safe to bottle.
     
  4. Bubba Wade

    Bubba Wade Well-Known Member

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    Take a hydrometer reading. But if it’s still producing a bubble more frequently than every minute, it’s likely that fermentation is continuing.

    I like to wait about a week after “active” fermentation has stopped before packaging. CO2 may not be produced, but the yeast is still working on other elements of fermentation.
     
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  5. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

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    Unless you've got a refractometer Nosy's advice makes sense to me. Refractometers only need a few millimeters to check the gravity. Hydrometers take too much when you're brewing 1 gallon batches.
     
  6. Blackmuse

    Blackmuse Well-Known Member

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    JA gave some solid advice given your situation. If you can see the beer it can help you identify if the beer is still working or not. However, giving it an extra week will not hurt it.
     
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  7. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Either that or cut your priming sugar in half...
    Just to add another dimension to the thread...
    FWIW prob the least contollable solution but what your doing is spunding in the bottle pretty cool way would be to bottle like 4 points before Final Gravity (found by using Real Wort Fast Ferment test) and you don't need to prime at all:rolleyes:.
     
  8. Jonny the Brewer

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    Thanks Mark. Can you recommend any cheap refractometers? I think this is the way I'd like to go, so as not to lose much in the hydrometer tests. Thanks
     
  9. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

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    I'd look to spend in the $45-$60 dollar range. That will get you a reliable, quality meter. A drop will do to get a reading, but you will have to keep in mind, you will need to convert (there are many online including here on brewersfriend) the reading once fermentation is done as once alcohol is present the reading isn't accurate and will need to be adjusted. Super simple once you learn the process.
     
  10. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Adding to that: If you're checking to see if fermentation is done, no need to convert, just look for the same reading at least two consecutive days (three is better).
     
  11. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, what you're looking for at the end is whether or not it's still changing, not what the final number actually is.
     
  12. Herm_brews

    Herm_brews Well-Known Member

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    I brew 1.5 gallon batches, and my approach is to ferment at least 3 weeks, oftentimes longer. A refractometer is part of my tool kit, but I elect just to be patient and let the yeast take their time, rather than repeatedly opening the fermenter for samples. Collecting samples will expose your precious beer to oxygen, which is best avoided, especially at such small volumes. If you are patient, you will end up with beer that tastes good and does not explode your bottles.
     
  13. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Lots of good advice above, Herms patience approach may be your best bet, but there are many ways to skin a cat (still haven't met anyone who skinned a cat mind you). Patience is the most difficult thing when starting out with brewing, but the yeast are living organisms, and they are sometimes unpredictable.
    Let us know what you decide, and how it turns out.
     
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  14. west1m

    west1m Active Member

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    I tried to skin a skunk once, didn't go well for me at all...
     
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