Black IPA, my second all grain

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by Leard, Nov 7, 2017.

  1. Leard

    Leard New Member

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  2. thehaze

    thehaze Active Member

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    I like the grainbill, it is simple.

    The hopping is however underwhelmed.

    You should know that you kinda need a bit more hops in a Black IPA, to notice. This is at least my experience.

    I used 10 oz hops for dry hopping only for my latest Black IPA and that was a 6 gallons batch ( 7.3% ABV, 70 IBU ).

    I would say if you leave it like you have it now, you will get a nice dark ale, but not a Black IPA.
     
  3. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    The dark roast flavor in this style should be slightly muted. You're probably closer to a Porter with that grain bill. I'd cut back the Chocolate a little and get some color and deep caramel flavors from C-90 or even C-120. Special B is a good one for adding some color along with nutty, toasty notes rather than burnt flavors. Malt complexity really adds to this style, I think.
    The hop choices are fine, but go with a lot more at flame-out. Cascade is very fine and if you have some Willamette, it pairs beautifully for a big NW style like this.
    Nottingham yeast is a good all-around choice, but for this style, the go-to is Chico strain.
    All that being said, if you brewed it as is (with stronger aroma hopping, that is), you wouldn't be unhappy with it.
    ;)
     
  4. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    to JA's point, you could cap the mash with the darker, roasted malts to maximize color while minimizing the flavor contribution. Just keep those grains separate and toss them on top of the mash before you sparge. the key being "before." ask me how i know that...:rolleyes:
     
  5. Group W

    Group W Well-Known Member

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    #5 Group W, Nov 7, 2017
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2017
    I really like a good black ipa! Agree with others here on the need for high ibu’s and the dark malt as a late addition. I also like to mash a bipa around 149 degrees F to dry it out a bit. I bet this turns out very drinkable though. Enjoy!
     
  6. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I'm gonna chalk that up to typo. ^^^ :D:rolleyes:
    I concur on the low mash temp...I used 151 and could have stood another point or two in attenuation. There's not much chance of getting a thin beer if your malt bill is checking all the boxes.
     
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  7. Leard

    Leard New Member

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    I have extra cascade, perhaps I can throw some more in when I dry hop. What would you say is a good amount to dry hop with?
     
  8. Leard

    Leard New Member

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    I'm going to add some more cascade at dry hop I think.
     
  9. Leard

    Leard New Member

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    How exactly does it work with doing late additions with regards to when you add the grain to the mash?
     
  10. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    I'd just brew without any unfamiliar techniques until you get more used to the overall process. If you really want to make a change to your recipe just lower the amount of dark roast a little.
    Here's a suggestion that keeps it simple while boosting the dark caramel malt flavor and keeps it from being a little too roasty for style.
    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/564652/black-ipa
     
  11. Group W

    Group W Well-Known Member

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    It’s trial and error, but dark malts (over 400L and milled) can be added and stirred in toward the end of the mash. Like with 10 minutes remaining on a 60 minute mash. Some like to use dehusked dark grain like Blackprinz to reduce the bitterness. Best to just make a batch and then tweak it. When I get my water analysis back I will post a recipe. Cheers!
     
  12. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Or some pairings of Fuggles/cascade
    And if you wanna try something different some special W from weyerman picked some of this recently havnt got a clear taste of it yet though.

    And maybe a small amount of oats instead of the brown sugar for a creamy slick mouthfeel?
     
  13. Group W

    Group W Well-Known Member

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    Hey Leard, Did you brew this one yet? :)
     

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