Altbeir suggestions

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Ward Chillington, Mar 9, 2019.

  1. Ward Chillington

    Ward Chillington Well-Known Member

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    So I am looking to try an Alt recipe but one the highest rated recipes in the database

    https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/view/219836/bakke-brygg-altbier-25-l

    has some helpful and lengthily instructions that look to be in German and even with Google's Translate, leaves some open questions in my mind, which is par for the course with that app which is OK, it got me in the ball park when I'm looking for my seats behind the dugout but I digress.

    "The amount of pulp and rinse water you should use depends on the equipment and method you use. As an estimate, we can say that you can use 20 liters of water and 13.6 liters of rinse water for this beer. Some brewing machines (eg Speidel Braumeister) may require larger amounts of mashing water. Always check the manual of the equipment you are using.

    Blade at 66 degrees for 75 minutes. Exfoliate at 77 degrees for 5 minutes if you have the opportunity to increase the temperature of the blade.

    Cool down to 16 degrees before pitching the yeast.

    Fermentation of 17 degrees to storm fermentation begins to decrease (typically after 3-5 days). Then increase to 20 degrees and hold for the rest of the fermentation period (a total of 14 days).

    Yeast options: WLP011, WLP029, Safale K-97 "


    17 degrees to storm fermentation ??? What the heck is that? I've heard " storm's a brewing" but I don't think that's what they mean! I'm thinking it means "to start and bring about". I also thought I would has seen something about decoction but nope, nothing.

    Based on what I have read so far, there are methods that use decoction mashing and ones that don't and I am completely open to the harder decoction method but I just need some step by step instructions since I have not found a good description or YouTube to tell me the "how to" to date.

    I'm looking for suggestions Forum Folks!
     
  2. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    I think it meant start not storm.
     
  3. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    Thought I might be able to help....but that definitely ain't no german! :p
     
  4. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    If it were German, I could help.
     
  5. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    #5 J A, Mar 9, 2019
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2019
    It's not German. It's Norwegian.
    Based on the context I'm thinking that's a reference to high krausen.

    PS...a little exporation shows that "stor" is the Norwegian word for "large". I suspect the m is an added conjunctive. Close enough for me.
     
    Ward Chillington likes this.
  6. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    Mash 66c as per your system profile start fermentation 17c.

    His estimate 20lt mash water 13.5 lt sparge water but you'll go by your brew system requirements.
    Tweek using calculator to his OG and IBUs and you should have a near replica.
    Oh and SRM.

    I think he's Scandinavian...​
     
  7. Ward Chillington

    Ward Chillington Well-Known Member

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    Here's the actual verbiage copied and pasted from the database...and Google Translate did indeed detected Norwegian, I mistakenly assumed German:

    Mengden meske- og skyllevann du bør bruke kommer an på utstyret og metoden du brygger med. Som et anslag kan vi si at du kan bruke 20 l meskevann og 13,6 l skyllevann til dette ølet. Noen bryggemaskiner (f.eks. Speidel Braumeister) kan kreve større mengder meskevann. Sjekk alltid manualen på utstyret du bruker.

    Mesking på 66 grader i 75 min. Utmesk på 77 grader i 5 min hvis du har mulighet til å øke temperatur i mesken.

    Kjøl ned til 16 grader før pitching av gjær.

    Gjæring på 17 grader til stormgjæring begynner å avta (typisk etter 3-5 dager). Øk deretter til 20 grader og hold resten av gjæringsperioden (totalt 14 dager).

    Gjæralternativer: WLP011, WLP029, Safale K-97

    Is it a good assumption that this is the mash and sparge schedule? I'm thinking that "Blade" is the closest equivalent to Mash and Exfoliate is the same for rinse. Thoughts?

    Mesking på 66 grader i 75 min. Utmesk på 77 grader i 5 min hvis du har mulighet til å øke temperatur i mesken.

    Blade at 66 degrees for 75 minutes. Exfoliate at 77 degrees for 5 minutes if you have the opportunity to increase the temperature of the blade.

    Thanks
     
  8. J A

    J A Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, it's the mash schedule. It's a pretty basic infusion from the looks of it. You could change it in whatever way you need to fit your system and process. Altbier wants to be relatively dry and crisp so the 150F range suggested here makes sense. And the 170F is just a mash-out rest. Some brewers skip the mash-out but I find that it helps with efficiency.
    It looks like a solid recipe. Since the style should be relatively subtle in flavor (not like a stout or porter), you might consider "capping" the mash with the dark roasted malt to avoid any iodine/ashtray notes and get color and a little roasted flavor.
     

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