Yeast life / potassium sorbate

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Wayne Schroeder, Nov 1, 2018.

  1. Wayne Schroeder

    Wayne Schroeder New Member

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    I am thinking of doing a hard cider and or adding fruit to NEIPA and am trying to become familiar with potassium sorbate and yeast life cycle.

    Specifically, I understand that potassium sorbate prevents yeast reproduction, but it will not keep yeast from fermenting. Basically, yeast can only eat until they die off and cannot renew... so, the real question is how long do individual yeast cells live on to produce alcohol if they get hit with the potassium sorbate? Do they just die off after some period of time?
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    We use it in off-dry wines to prevent refermentation - but it's two-stage. You need sulfites as well to kill the yeast. I don't know the amounts off the top of my head, though.
     
  3. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    Hi Wayne,
    In the OP you said Cider and or NEIPA.
    So, Wine and Beer.
    I wouldn't consider treating them the same for many reasons.
    Wine, finished still, would typically get sulfate and sorbate to stabilize it.
    Beer, finished carbonated, would be primed or carbonated and served "Fizzy".
    Cider, which is typically finished as sparkling, would be treated as a "Beer".
    So, what do you want to do?
    I'll be happy to guide you after I know that?
    Brian
     

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