Wort aeration

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by Aub, Apr 7, 2018.

  1. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

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    I just splash when I transfer to the fermenter and after I pitch I give it a shake for a minute or so.

    As good as our yeast is today I don't think it is as important as it use to be. No aeration all the way to aeration stone are valid. Really depends on how much effort and money you want to spend.
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    True that.... Mostly. Yeast still need a minimum of oxygen to get started. 8 ppm is good for most "regular" beers - I give big beers and lagers more - and it's also about the max you can get by splashing (air's 20% oxygen). Less, the yeast adapt. More, the yeast adapt. It's not a critical variable, the acceptable range is wide, but it's important to beer. Improving yeast strains has had little effect on its need for O2.
     
  3. Hogarthe

    Hogarthe Well-Known Member

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    Especially using dry yeast. They are said to be good to go. Liquid yeast I think depends on how old it is, and if you used yeast nutrients or not. More aeration would be needed if you didn't use nutrients, they need something.
     
  4. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

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    #24 BoomerBrian, Apr 7, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2018
    I should have given the disclaimer that I generally brew 5-7% ales.

    I think this quote sums it up pretty well.

    https://www.morebeer.com/articles/how_yeast_use_oxygen

    EDIT: I think everyone should at least do some aeration seeing it can be done in a couple of minutes with zero cost.
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    True all dat.... But read carefully and the quote says basically you may or you may not need oxygen. Yeast needs oxygen to synthesize lipids but in other cases it might be bad.... Given, too much can lead to oxidation. Instead of giving usable levels of oxygen, it states that the need for oxygen depends on a number of factors.... Too much out there tells me that yeast need oxygen to kick off fermentation. Shaking, stirring, airstones, oxygen, all work. Brewing is one of those arts where if you want three opinions, ask two brewers. If you want four, ask a brewing scientist. I'll keep oxygenating, not even the LoDo folks say you don't need oxygen in the wort at pitch.

    Make the following test: Take a sample of the wort straight from the kettle, chilled, and pitch a bit of yeast into it. Take a sample after you've aerated, same size, and pitch the same amount of yeast into it. Set both samples in a cool dark place and observe the fermentations. Get as close to sterile as possible with the transfers and the containers. Taste the samples once they've fermented. Then you'll have an idea of what no oxygen and aerated wort do in fermentation.
     
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  6. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    Rather have someone else taste the samples not knowing what is being tested. See if they can tell a difference. 3/4 people last night I tested couldn't tell the Munich Lager Yeast half of a batch from the Belgian Saison yeast half of a batch I made. Even with multiple tries, hardly scientific but I think a lot of the affects are overblown.
     
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  7. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. Knowing what you are tasting makes a huge difference.
     
  8. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    When using liquid yeast I use an aquarium pump and 5 micron stone for 15 or 20 minutes for dry I just shake the fermenter for 2 or 3 minutes..
     
  9. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    I use an air stone with a nebulizer pump with a hepa filter. Takes about 30 seconds and then have to wait for foam to recede a little before I can pitch yeast. Tim the tool man style. Along with Wyeast yeast nutrient I get consistently better attenuation than predicted by manufacturer. Lots of ways to keep those YEASTIES:D happy.
     
  10. Firerat

    Firerat New Member

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    I use the micro stone an pure O2 if I make something big or something special.

    But for most of my ales I use a wine degasser on a drill for a few minutes. Seems to get the job done.
     
  11. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    When I 1st stared brewing, I did nothing.
    Then shaking, whipping, pump and stone, and finally pure Oxygen with a stainless Steel stone.
    What I find interesting is that Home Brewers go to great length avoiding bacteria in their process, but when the Wort is most susceptible, they throw caution to the wind and stir, splash, whip or whatever!
    The air is full of bacteria!
    Just sayin,
    Brian
     
  12. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    That's a good point Brian. Always wondered about that myself. Was thinking that could be where "house flavors" come from? I always filter my air from pump but stuff that floats in the air is pretty darn small.
     
  13. BoomerBrian

    BoomerBrian Active Member

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    I shake after the lid is on.
     
  14. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

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    When teaching, I always explain it as if it's always snowing except the snow is too small to see.
    If you think of it that way, you'll avoid or reduce getting snow ( Bacteria) in your wort.
    Cheers
    Brian
     

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