Wheat beer blog

Discussion in 'General Chit-Chat' started by Medarius, Feb 3, 2018.

  1. Medarius

    Medarius Active Member

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    Just finished reading BF blog on wheat beer and in the middle you put up the complete wrong pronunciation of the word hefeweizen . I would expect better from this wonderful site.

    hay-fuh-vy-tsen is not even close and I can't figure how this became the norm. In German an e is never said as a u, so how the fuh part got in there I can't guess.

    Heh /fə / vai/tsən is how it should be said. hef-ay would be closer than hay-fuh

    Just my 2 cents as a former german speaker
     
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  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    As a current German speaker, he's right. Let's clean up our Deutsch, gentlepeople!

    (American pronunciation would still get you a Weizen, your choice Kristal or Trub, in any German Kneipe)
     
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  3. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    #3 sbaclimber, Feb 3, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2018
    hmmm, I am originally from the NE, learned German in Hannover (they claim to speak pure hochdeutsch...) and currently live in the former east Germany.
    Ignoring that the local dialect here is anything but hochdeutsch, I don't see where "hay-fuh-vy-tsen" is all that wrong. Yes, "fuh" should be "fə", and okay, "tsen" should be "tsən" (eyeroll), but I don't hear the rest as being imo all that incorrect.
    I am guessing it has more to do with my own NE accent than the actual german pronunciation though...
     
  4. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    HAHAHAHA, definitely how NOT to pronounce it...:D
     
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  5. Medarius

    Medarius Active Member

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    I never learned hoch deutche.. just bayerisch . i just find it amusing when someone says the word hefe alone..they don't say hay fuh so why when they add weizen at end does the first word change? weiss bier mit hay fuh?? might get you an odd look in Furth :))

    And as my mother in law used to say of her east german cousins… east germans speak german like americans speak english, not very well. :))
     
  6. sbaclimber

    sbaclimber Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't necessarily. Some dialect mispronounce just "hefe" too... ;)
     
  7. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    In Australia we call it wheat beer can we all agree on that!:D Not that it's really a thing over here....
     
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  8. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

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    “hefe” means “yeast.” and "Weizen” means “wheat” or sometimes "white" so as long as there is different meanings there can be different dialogs as well tomato tomoto
     
  9. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Weizen does not mean white. White is weiss in German. Weizen is wheat. That said, I learned German in the west, the Mosel valley, and to me, it's more like "heh-fuh-weits-ehn".
     
  10. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Make that "heh-fuh-veitz-ehn"
     
  11. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

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    You should here me say that after a few beverages any chance saying it without flem flying from the mouth:D.
     
  12. Ozarks Mountain Brew

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    hows this after a few "haw fen wyzin"
     
  13. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    It does get rather hard to say.... Particularly with the "noch ein" before and the "bitte" aferward.
     

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