What is your Go To recipe when testing a new yeast strain?

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by oliver, Aug 29, 2019.

  1. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    Of all the gross places in the world to scrape yeast, I'm getting a completely untested strain scraped from the French Quarter that Bootleg Biology has banked. I quote in my correspondence with them, "Don't really have anything useful to pass along about the culture." Sounds like fun. I was going to do one of my tried and true recipes, but I'm all ears on this one. lemme hear ya
     
  2. AGbrewer

    AGbrewer Active Member

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    I would probably do a SMASH that you are familiar with to see how the yeast tastes. That way there are so few variables to evaluate, the yeast character would be easier to identify.
     
  3. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Simple SMASH: Pale ale, Magnum hops to about 0.4 - 0.5 BU/GU, no flavor or aroma hops, split, one with control yeast (say US-05) and the other with the yeast of choice. Alternately, do the exact same thing with extract. Ferment the same, have someone pour you a triangle test when done.
     
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  4. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

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    smash sounds good, i might finish it with some hallertau though, or go with something like Sterling.
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Don't, if your goal is to really test the yeast, that is. Do a small batch, split it, and reduce to as few variables as possible so that you can be sure that the difference you get is the result of your treatment (different yeast), not something else. That's why I like to use extract for this kind of test - it's very consistent (and very easy to make two gallons and split into two batches).
     

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