Water profile guide

Discussion in 'Brewing Photos & Videos' started by Bottom Shelf Brewery, Apr 30, 2017.

?

Any thoughts?

  1. Good?

    6 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. Bad?

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Other?

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Bottom Shelf Brewery

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2015
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Location:
    Australia
    Not sure if this is any use to anyone else, but i have put this together from research i have done.
     

    Attached Files:

    Trialben likes this.
  2. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2012
    Messages:
    2,457
    Likes Received:
    1,947
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Rosedale, MD
    From the little bit I know of water, that looks to be a handy cheat sheet. Thanks for the hard work, you deserve a beer!
     
  3. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    good technical information, thanks for that, its a little small, I had to blow it up to read it I guess its meant for phones and for the beginning brewer its probably going over their head but they have to start somewhere lol
     
  4. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Learner brewer would generally be well advised to focus on practices first before delving into water chemistry .( it makes a difference of course )
    Depending where you are on our vast planet the starting water will be very different and as such will be treated differently if at all depending on style
     
  5. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    one thing missing is the need to have your water tested first, like with ward labs reports, this is what people don't get at first. without that beginning water nothing you add matters
     
  6. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,438
    Likes Received:
    6,697
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Agreed, a beginner won't get a lot of benefits from thinking about water. In the new How To Brew, Palmer gives five priorities in order: sanitation, fermentation temperature control, yeast management, controlling the boil and finally the recipe. Water chemistry doesn't make the top five.
     
    Mark D Pirate likes this.
  7. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Water chemistry is the difference between a good beer and a great one but like nosy pointed out its not top 5 things to focus on for new brewers
     
  8. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2015
    Messages:
    3,240
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I never bothered to do anything with my water. I like my beer, so that's good enough for me. Maybe it could be better. Ignorance is bliss!!
     
    Mase likes this.
  9. Mark D Pirate

    Mark D Pirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    1,887
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Occupation:
    Master carpenter , all round good guy
    Location:
    Radelaide SA , Australia
    Depending where you are you may not need to do anything at all , remove the chlorine and add a touch of gypsum is enough with mine
     
  10. jeffpn

    jeffpn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2015
    Messages:
    3,240
    Likes Received:
    1,557
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I totally get that. I know I'm lucky. When I sell my house, it'll be to a homebrewer. He'll pay double!!!
     
    Mase, Mark D Pirate and Trialben like this.
  11. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,469
    Likes Received:
    9,555
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Cheers BSB top notch I thought you must be a new administration dude thanks for your hard work adding these minerals to the Mash/Boil in my opinion definitely helps with the beers outcome.
     
  12. gmull70

    gmull70 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2013
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    East Providence
  13. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,438
    Likes Received:
    6,697
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    Sulfates emphasize bitterness - I find it harsh. Chlorides emphasize malt flavors. I can't tell exactly what you're trying to make, your water is balanced more toward a bitter outcome, more appropriate for pale ales and IPAs. Based on your final RA, you should make a good pale ale or amber style out of this. Does that help?
     
    gmull70 likes this.
  14. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    with my water this will be extremely bitter, I would never use that much gypsum even in 10 gallons, the malt vs hop/bitterness is all relative to the source water and can change drastically per person so its hard for use to tell you what you want
     
  15. gmull70

    gmull70 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2013
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    East Providence
    What is it that you find harsh the anount of gypsum im using?
     
  16. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,438
    Likes Received:
    6,697
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    No, I checked the water report you attached and from what I see, you should be okay - the water will emphasize hop bitterness but it's still in the "balanced" range. Water is an area that's really easy to over-think, particularly for a new brewer. Your base water is very soft, you should be able to brew just about anything light with it with no modification. What I was saying, I generally don't add gypsum, I find the result to be a harsh taste. Lots of people like it. I tend to like softer, rounder, maltier beers so I work with chloride.

    There's a really good book out there called, you guessed it, "Water." But if you're a relatively new brewer, I'd advise leaving water chemistry alone for a while and concentrating on your sanitation, your fermentation temperature, pitching enough healthy yeast, boiling vigorously and reasonable recipe formulation. Mastering these will give you much better beer than trying to emulate someone's water chemistry. And if you haven't mastered these, you'll never know the difference the salts make, your beer will vary too much to detect the effect.
     
    Mark D Pirate likes this.
  17. gmull70

    gmull70 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2013
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    East Providence
    Yea ive been brewing for about 5 years and in the padt year started.looking at water. I am finding it somewhat challenging. I thought about getti g that book but hear its very technical. Wondering if I would truly grasp everything
     
  18. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,438
    Likes Received:
    6,697
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    I didn't find it particularly technical but I guess some did. Grasping everything doesn't seem to be that important. The purpose of water treatment, as long as you're not trying to get a particular mineral flavor in the beer - is to adjust the mash pH - it needs to be from about 5.2 to about 5.5 to avoid some problems with astringency or poor conversion. There's a (relatively) simple concept called Residual Alkalinity that will help you hit the mash pH number. If you master that, your beer will improve. No need to emulate Burton or Dusseldorf or Plzn's water as long as you hit the mash pH.
     
  19. gmull70

    gmull70 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2013
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Location:
    East Providence
    #19 gmull70, May 3, 2017
    Last edited: May 3, 2017
    hey thanks for all the info. I went back and took a look at the water calculator, in the overall water report it states that the residual alkalinity ppm as caco3 -85.2 wondering what you could tell me about this? here is a link for the recipie I plan on making this Sunday the only change im making is Ill be brewing 10 gall
    iframe width="100%" height="500px" src="https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/embed/487189" frameborder="0"></iframe>
     
  20. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,438
    Likes Received:
    6,697
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    I found a Residual Alkalinity calculator here: http://www.franklinbrew.org/tools/rac2.html. If you click the "More" button in Brewer's Friend's Recipe Builder you can see the RA range is listed among the other more advanced parameters. Plugging in the SRM of your recipe - 4.81 - the calculator tells me your RA should be -35 ppm as CaCO3. You're actually over-improving your water. Calcium decreases RA, try adding less gypsum. RA is generally given as a range, in this case the range is -64 to -5 with -35 right in the middle, a safe place to be. If you want your mash pH to be lower (more acidic), tend to the lower end of the range, that'll give a slightly tarter beer. For less tart, shoot for the high end. The critical value is your mash pH which should be in the range given above. I prefer the lower end - a tarter beer. Your call. But less calcium will increase the RA, as will less magnesium to a lesser extent.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white