vegetable additions

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by fire60, Apr 11, 2016.

  1. fire60

    fire60 New Member

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    I am thinking of doing a west coast style ale with some capsicum added to the ferment (a bit like dry hopping) to add a different flavour. I am not sure about a starting point on amount. does any one have an opinion on a good starting point so as to get some flavour coming through and then adjust with subsequent brews to get desired flavour?

    Regards,
    Pete
     
  2. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    I'm not quite sure what kind of pepper you'd be using, but I suggest taking whatever you determine to be a conservative amount, and then backing off that about 25%. Better to have a beer that you wish was more of this or that than have a beer that's undrinkable.

    If you mean dried red pepper flakes, I'd say make it 50%, those things are deceptively potent.

    Litttle off topic, but What kind of hops were you thinking?
     
  3. fire60

    fire60 New Member

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    Hello Jmac,

    I was thinking of using fresh capsicum (not the fiery stuff) these are green. We have also been having some sweet red ones in salad lately, so I thought I might also try them. I agree with your thoughts on going under rather than over with quantity. I did a ginger beer last year, and the first batch was ok, but a bit under catered for. I upped the ginger in batch 2 and it was spot on.

    I brewed a west coast style APA in January which is my own recipe Citra, galaxy and simcoe. It turned out pretty bloody good so, I am thinking of using this as my base. A local brewery (Garage project) who I think you visited on your road trip? do a hopped up ale with chili vietnamese mint and other stuff. It is very tasty. If I can get somewhere near that I will be pleased.

    Pete
     
  4. jmcnamara

    jmcnamara Well-Known Member

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    Interesting, there's a hop that has some green pepper taste to it. Equinox I think. But it also has some other tastes and smells going on.

    And yeah, we loved Garage Project! Really like their setup and their beer is good too, lots of different stuff. And to go a little more off topic, I heard recently they were teaming with a brewery here in the States, Victory I think.

    Good luck with trying to recreate that beer, sounds like a witches brew of ingredients
     
  5. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    When I do what you're talking about, dry-hopping with peppers, I've dry-hopped with 11 ounces of roasted poblanos and got good pepper flavor. Use that as a starting point if you'd like but what I'd do if I were trying to determine the levels: Run the beer off into gallon jars and dry hop with (scaled) amounts, say an ounce in number one, two ounces in number two, etc. Once you know the level that works, scale it up to the entire batch. Another thing: You don't have to do it all in one go. Peppers are variable just as any agricultural product is, so why not dry hop with say five ounces, taste, add more if needed. That's the method I use for my "Blackened Pale Ale" and it works nicely.

    Good luck with it!
     

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