too much foam from keg

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by griz, Feb 19, 2015.

  1. griz

    griz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Greetings. Put my first batch of a honey-rye into my first keg last week. Put psi at 30 for 1 day. On the 2nd day, reduced psi to about 20. On 3rd day, dropped it to around 11 psi (serving psi) and let it sit at that setting for 2 more days.

    I didn't do any of the rolling\shaking of the keg.

    After approx 5 days, I poured my beer and had about 60/40 foam/beer. The beer tasted great, but had more foam than what I wanted. Turned off co2 tank, bled some co2 off and lowered the psi down to 9. Still getting too much foam, but better than what it was.

    I have 3/16 line at 5ft, which based on various websites, that matches to what I need for my keezer tempt. System is brand new, so not worried about dirty components (I cleaned/sanitized them before adding beer). Beer taste great, so not worried about contamination. For now, I'm using the party taps (cleaned/sanitized them also).

    Over carbonation? Beer lines too short? If you lower the psi too much, do you run into producing flat beer?

    Any input would be great. Thanks!!
     
  2. SwampWater

    SwampWater Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2013
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Cavan, Ontario, Canada
    You may of over carbed your beer. You can bleed off the keg often, or bring it out to room temp and bleed it off then.
     
  3. newmanwell

    newmanwell Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2012
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Jacksonville, FL
    When you drink the beer does it feel overcarbonated? If not 5 feet seems ok but longer may help. When I have a foam issue I usually pour a couple ounces in the glass let everything settle down for 15 seconds or so and pour away. Too low of a serving pressure will lead to undercarbonation as the keg empties.
     
  4. Ozarks Mountain Brew

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2012
    Messages:
    7,767
    Likes Received:
    3,976
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    IT Managment
    Location:
    The Ozark Mountains of Missouri
    On beer that's too foamy I just turn the pressure down to 2 psi , works good
     
    J A likes this.
  5. griz

    griz Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2015
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Howdy. I bled off the C02 several times during the day and dropped the psi down to about 7. Poured a glass tonite and was happy to have a perfect glass of honey-rye. Hoorah
     
    J A likes this.
  6. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,251
    Likes Received:
    2,450
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Back in the mountains
    7 is a little low for serving, but you can kick it up a bit as you get the co2 evened out. welcome to the wonderful world of not bottling. You will still do both though. :lol: Is your honey rye close to Tamarack's Rye Sally Rye? I really enjoy a pint of that beer with the buffalo burger!!!
     
  7. UgliestLemming

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2014
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    16
    Location:
    Saint Paul
    My advice (this is what I did):
    1.) Serving PSI = Carbing PSI
    2.)Use this guide and the chart on this page for slow carbonation (for consistent results.) 30 PSI is what I use when trying to speed through carbonation, and will not give consistent results.
    3.) Foaming problems? Balance your system for the type of pressure you're carbing at.
     
  8. ardentmonk

    ardentmonk New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Yeah, Welcome to kegging!

    I had a keg with the same symptoms; hooked up to serving psi waited to serve, then got foam 50/50. I vented pressure several times until I could not pour. When increased again ( not overcarbed) I got 50/50 foam again.

    I heard a sucking sound when pouring, so I replaced the poppet on the serving side and awesome pilsner flowed brillantly clear and refreshing= $4.

    I also have 5 feet of line. Works fine. :D
     
  9. emsroth

    emsroth Member

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2016
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    8
    I'm in the same problem.

    My solution will be the same - purge and wait. I'm hoping by thursday night I'll have good beer.
     
  10. The Brew Mentor

    The Brew Mentor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2012
    Messages:
    961
    Likes Received:
    578
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Mentor, Ohio
    1 thing not mentioned is to never try to restrict the pour to slow it down. This just causes restriction and more foaming issues. When pouring, open the tap fully and close completely when full.
    Brian
     
    Trialben, jeffpn and J A like this.
  11. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,419
    Likes Received:
    9,466
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    Yep learnt that when i picked up me picnic tap i was pouring 50/50 @ 10psi and thinking what:eek: only backing off again on the next pour and so on...

    Yep open her up and let her flow:).
     
  12. lionman

    lionman New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2017
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    3
    What temp are you serving at? Temperature is a very important factor in balancing a keg. You need to know what temp the beer in the keg is at to know what pressure to set it at to get a certain level of carbonation.

    Also the temperature of your tap is also important. If the tap is warm, it will warm the beer that comes through it which will force the CO2 out of solution. You may find your second glass in quick succession is much better pour. If this is the case you can try dunking your tap in ice water for a minute or two to chill it down before pulling a beer.

    If you have a kegerator, a font fan or shank fan can help keep the tap cold too.
     
    Trialben likes this.
  13. Trialben

    Trialben Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2016
    Messages:
    9,419
    Likes Received:
    9,466
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Pest control tech
    Location:
    Palmwoods QLD
    2nd this i always find my second pour better than first i link it to everything being colder including tap housing.
     
  14. Karl@OneMore

    [email protected] New Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2017
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    3
    I was looking for some information on the same problem I am having, so I am glad this kind of information is out there. I will try the methods mentioned and see how it goes.
     

Share This Page

arrow_white