Tips & Tricks

Discussion in 'General Brewing Discussions' started by BOB357, Mar 31, 2019.

  1. HighVoltageMan!

    HighVoltageMan! Well-Known Member

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    #41 HighVoltageMan!, Apr 3, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2019
    It has to do with limiting any oxygen in the hot side starting with strike water all the way through boiling and pitching. The idea is that oxygen reduces malt flavors and it's specific to German styles. The goal is to get what is called the "it" flavor. If you don't know what that is, get a fresh Bitburger. It has the "it"flavor in it.

    It's controversial because some are totally for it and others are against saying it is unnecessary. It's also very strict in the procedure and requires a lot of equipment upgrades. I believe there is some truth to it, but I only implement some of the procedures and ideas. It can get expensive and tedious to implement completely.

    You can Google it, there's a lot of info out there on it.
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

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    Or one for true believers and one for skeptics? Limiting oxygen is of course desirable but what I've read of LoDo border on magic.
     
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  3. Craigerrr

    Craigerrr Well-Known Member

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    Thanks

    To get this thread back on track...

    I have a couple of extra kegs (at least for now), I use C02 to push cleaning fluid through beer lines. Flush with cleaning solution, rinse thoroughly with straight up water, than charge with sanitizer until it is time to hook up the next keg.
     
  4. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Great tip!
    Been doing that for quite some time now. Kind of a waste when you're cleaning kegs not to use the same solution to do the beer lines too.
     
  5. Group W

    Group W Well-Known Member

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    Great tip Craig. I’m doing that now. :)
     
  6. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    This one is mostly for you small batch brewers. Don't want to hassle with transferring to a bottling bucket. Don't want to chance stirring up a bunch of sediment when mixing in priming sugar solution. Use carb drops. Just drop one in each bottle, fill and cap.
    https://www.morebeer.com/products/carbonation-drops-60-pieces.html
    I keep a bag around to bottle what's left in the fermenter after filling a keg.
     
  7. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    If you’re using propane, be sure to not only have a full bottle as a spare, but test it to make sure it doesn’t leak. I’m speaking from experience. The primary tank ran out halfway through a 60 minute boil, but when I hooked up the new tank and opened the valve, it leaked out the back of the tank valve. Now I keep 3 tanks in rotation with two always full.
     
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  8. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    Famous words just before panic sets in: "I just filled it up 2 brews back".

    I'd add something to that for electric brewers. Keep your old brew kettle and a full propane tank in cas the power goes out.
     
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  9. Mase

    Mase Well-Known Member

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    #49 Mase, Apr 3, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2019
    Your first brew should be a simple* ale kit. Ale yeasts can ferment just fine in the 60’s and low 70’s, where as Lager yeast needs to ferment in the cold, and likely in a temperature controlled converted fridge or freezer in the upper 40s or 50s.

    Too often, i see in these forums, folks just starting into brewing and wanting to dive deep into a difficult or exotic beer. If it’s for a one-and-done brew, then go for it. But if you want to take it up as a hobby, do yourself a favor and start simple.

    * Amber Ale, Brown Ale. These are simple Grain bills and can hide some mistakes you are bound to make with your first brew.
     
  10. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

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    Plus 1 on the carb tabs. Simple way to carb evenly especially when you don't want to waste 3 or 4 beers still left in primary when kegging. There is a variety of them to choose from too. We are using small ones now that i believe take 3 to 6 tabs depending on bottle size. If bottling larger batches 5gal and up would not be very cost efficient though.
     
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  11. Hawkbox

    Hawkbox Well-Known Member

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    I personally just fill the keg without any special effort and then pressurize and burp the remaining gas out as best I can. It's worked pretty well for me for 2 years now. For beginners too you might want to look at Kveik yeast, that stuff is a beast and if you don't have temperature control it will ferment hot but not nasty. I really like it for summer brewing when it's harder to keep cool.
     
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  12. Aub

    Aub Active Member

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    I
    I do exactly the same as you and have never had a problem, I've thought about hitting the keg with CO2 first..................but if it ain't broke don't fix it.
     
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  13. BOB357

    BOB357 Well-Known Member

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    I do the same and feel that it's more important to minimize splashing when transferring. To accomplish this, I use the long straight part of an old racking cane in end of the transfer tubing so it reaches the bottom of the keg. Another way would be to use an adequate length of silicone tubing. It doesn't try to coil up like vinyl tubing.
     
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  14. Aub

    Aub Active Member

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    Yep, I use the same thing to avoid any splashing.
     
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