Stone Enjoy AFTER Clone

Discussion in 'Recipes for Feedback' started by oliver, Aug 24, 2019.

  1. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2015
    Messages:
    959
    Likes Received:
    371
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    LHBS owner
    Location:
    NOLA
    Trying to make a clone recipe of Stone's Enjoy After. Anyone remember these? They were just like Stone Enjoy By, but with Brett and preferred to age for a year. The website says "spiked at bottling with Brett", but my question is should I ferment 100% with Brett? Should I co-pitch with a real strain? (Enjoy By seems to have a consensus of Dry English Ale WLP007) Or should I ferment straight up with real yeast and then just bottle condition with Brett?

    I'm going to just base the recipe on Enjoy By, and do 50/50 Rahr 2-row and Crisp Best or Maris, plus dextrose. The hops are listed on Stone's website... but again, the question is fermentation.

    Any advice?
     
  2. Nosybear

    Nosybear Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2012
    Messages:
    9,438
    Likes Received:
    6,697
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Aurora, CO, USA
    If you want to reproduce the beer, get a tube of Brett, dump it in your bottling bucket and then package. I'd bottle-condition with Brett but be advised, the residual saccaromyces in your beer will do most of the carbing so undercarbonate to give the Brett a chance. I can't say by how much, though. Maybe don't add any priming sugar, since Brett can digest some of the stuff saccaromyces can't. Do some research, I'm just throwing stuff out....
     
  3. thunderwagn

    thunderwagn Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2015
    Messages:
    3,763
    Likes Received:
    7,328
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Loveland, CO
    You wouldn't happen to have a copy of the book American Sours by Michael Tonsmiere would you? He does have a section in the book on this topic. He may even have information on his website. https://www.themadfermentationist.com/
    If you're into sours and funk and the like, his book is excellent and a great read. I'd venture to say must have. Milk the funk may be a good reference for you as well.
     
  4. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2015
    Messages:
    959
    Likes Received:
    371
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    LHBS owner
    Location:
    NOLA
    i had a copy in my shop, sold it yesterday...
    What's the/is there a calculation for how much CO2 produced per gravity point? I've got WLP007 at 75% attenuation leaving me at ~1.015, plus giving Brett a year to much on the rest, isn't there a calculation for that?
     
  5. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2015
    Messages:
    959
    Likes Received:
    371
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    LHBS owner
    Location:
    NOLA
    some googling looks like 0.5 Volumes per gravity point, multiple by 15, 7.5 is too too many.
     
  6. Head First

    Head First Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2012
    Messages:
    2,256
    Likes Received:
    2,458
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Back in the mountains
    #6 Head First, Aug 24, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2019
    First off sounds fun! But I think I would finish ferment with the Brett. It always cleans out more sugars so will over carb in a bottle maybe? The million dollar question is when In fermentation to introduce it. My guess would be with just a few points left as the sour isn't a huge stand out if I remember correctly. Keep us posted.
    CHEERS AND GOOD LUCK


    Edit:
    By the way had a beer from Treehouse brewing a while back and it had a slight sour tart to it. Liked it so thought maybe would propagate the yeast. Did a small starter and it was very sour, not like the beer at all.
    They must be doing what you are investigating
     
    thunderwagn likes this.
  7. Mark Farrall

    Mark Farrall Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2017
    Messages:
    1,306
    Likes Received:
    1,428
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Melbourne Australia
    Pure brett primary fermentation is surprisling clean and very like a sacchromyces fermentation.

    I was listening to an interview with Tonsmiere on Basic Brewing recently and he was mentioning new information on how to maximise the funky flavours from Brett. It was very much in passing but he was hearing that it may be more related to using it under pressure or for packaging.

    I've done a couple of shorter mixed ferments with brett c which have had a nice slightly tropical fruit aroma from the brett. Haven't had them packaged long enough to really get a feel for how it ages though. Which sort of points to the other thing i'm hearing people with far more experience with brett say, that's it more diverse and has a wider set of flavour profiles than sach, and people are only just starting to get on top of how to push certain flavour profiles.

    So I suppose to turn the question around, what are you hoping for from the brett?
     
  8. oliver

    oliver Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2015
    Messages:
    959
    Likes Received:
    371
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Occupation:
    LHBS owner
    Location:
    NOLA
    I want the brett to get crazy and even eat some hop matter and produce tons of hoppiness and tons of funk, like Stone's Enjoy After.

    I'm thinking now I might do a normal fermentation of WLP007, and then rack into a keg with a big dry hop charge and Brett C or an Omega Blend, and put a spunding valve on it to keep pressure in check, then let it set up for a year or something. Takes away the chance of bottling it and testing aging times, though.
     
    Mark Farrall likes this.

Share This Page

arrow_white